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In the Critics this week

Žižek on Shakespeare, Barghouti on Palestine and Gray on the money.

In the Critics section of this week's New Statesman, Slovenian philosopher and cultural theorist Slavoj Žižek discusses Ralph Fienne's film adaptation of Shakespeare's Coriolanus and explains why the play is better than Hamlet. He writes that Fiennes "has done the impossible... He has fully broken out of the closed circle of interpretative options and presented Coriolanus not as a fanatical anti-democrat but as a figure of the radical left." Žižek writes: "Without changing a word in Shakespeare's play, the film looks squarely at us, at our predicament today, offering us the figure of the radical freedom fighter."

In this week's lead book review, John Gray praises Philip Coggan's new book Paper Promises: Money, Debt and the New World Order, calling it "the most illuminating account of the financial crisis to appear to date". Gray examines Coggan's exploration of the origins of money up to the present financial crisis and surmises that "little has been learned since the crash and, as a consequence, a crisis that our leaders have never properly understood is now entering an even more dangerous phase".

In the Books Interview, Jonathan Derbyshire talks to Mourid Barghouti about his new book, I Was Born There, I Was Born Here, which is about his return to Palestine from his current home in Cairo. "It's painful to restore the past, to try to relive it," says Barghouti. "Nobody ever returns completely and nothing is ever restored completely... What you crave is the moment, the time you spent in those places."

Also in Critics: Yo Zushi reviews Kathy Peiss's Zoot Suit: the Enigmatic Career of an Extreme Style and Rosie Goldsmith says that this year's Best European Fiction anthology falls short of its predecessor. Ryan Gilbey praises Chilean director Raúl Ruiz's latest film Mysteries of Lisbon and Rachel Cooke has a nauseous reaction to The National Anthem on Channel 4. Plus: a break down of this year's finest cultural events, Will Self's Madness of Crowds, Antonia Quirke on Radio 4's The Tenant of Wildfell Hall and a poem by Matthew Hollis.