Instant history: Occupy movement book to be released this December.

Profits from the book by Writers for the 99% will go to the protest movement.

The progressive press OR Books has announced the publication of an instant history of the anti-capitalist protest: Occupying Wall Street: The Inside Story of an Action that Changed the Course of America. It is written by Writers for the 99% who do not claim to officially represent the movement, but actively support it and have come together specifically for this project. Copies of the book will be available on 17 December- the three month anniversary of the movement's beginnings in Liberty Square, downtown Manhattan. All profits from the book will go to the occupation.

Colin Robinson, co-publisher at OR Books, spoke about the book's aims:

It's a tremendous challenge to produce a worthwhile book in such a short space of time. But Occupy Wall Street is an action of historic proportions and we believe it's important to create at least a first draft of that history as it is occurring. In assembling the book we will do all we can to respect the transparency and non-hierarchical structures that are the hallmark of Occupy Wall Street. We're making no claims to be creating the authorized version of events, that's impossible at this point. But by bringing together first-rate interviewers, writers and editors, we believe we can tell a story of the occupation which describes its extraordinary achievements and encourages their spread across America and around the world.

The book will also cover the movement's structure and organisation; chapter headings include the general assembly, the kitchen, the medical centre, clean-up and education and empowerment.

Other writers have joined together in support of Occupy Wall Street and the global Occupy movement by signing an online petition. It lists over 1000 names, including Salman Rushdie, Michael Cunningham and the Director of Digital at The Onion, Baratunde Thurston. Read more on this here.

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Why a Keeping Up with the Kardashians cartoon would make genuinely brilliant TV

The Kardashians are their own greatest satirists.

You’ve seen Keeping Up with the Kardashians, Kourtney and Kim Take Kyoto, and Kylie and Kendall Klarify Kommunications Kontracts, but the latest Kardashian show might take a step away from reality. Yes, Kartoon Kardashians could be on the way. According to TMZ, an animated cartoon is the next Kardashian television property we can expect: the gossip website reports that Kris Jenner saw Harvey Weinstein’s L.A. production company earlier this month for a pitch meeting.

It’s easy to imagine the dramas the animated counterparts of the Kardashians might have: arguments over who gets the last clear plastic salad bowl? Moral dilemmas over whether or not to wear something other than Balenciaga to a high profile fashion event? Outrage over the perceived betrayals committed by their artisanal baker?

If this gives you déjà vu, it might be because of a video that went viral over a year ago made using The Sims: a blisteringly accurate parody of Keeping Up with the Kardashians that sees the three sisters have a melodramatic argument about soda.

It’s hysterical because it clings onto the characteristics of the show: scenes opening with utter banalities, sudden dramatic music coinciding with close-ups of each family member’s expressions, a bizarre number of shots of people who aren’t speaking, present tense confessionals, Kim’s ability to do an emotional 0-60, and Kourtney’s monotonous delivery.

But if the Kardashians, both as a reality TV show and celebrity figures, are ripe for ridicule, no one is more aware of it than the family themselves. They’ve shared teasing memes and posted their own self-referential jokes on their social channels, while Kim’s Kimoji app turned mocking viral pictures into self-depreciating in-jokes for her fans. And the show itself has a level of self-awareness often misinterpreted as earnestness - how else could this moment of pure cinema have made it to screen?

The Kardashians are their own greatest satirists, and they’ve perfected the art of making fun of themselves before anyone else can. So there’s a good chance that this new cartoon won’t be a million miles away from “Soda Drama”. It might even be brilliant.

Anna Leszkiewicz is a pop culture writer at the New Statesman.