Is it time for a new literary prize?

Leading figures in the publishing world think so.

I blogged yesterday about the misgivings expressed here and elsewhere about this year's Man Booker Prize shortlist. I ended by observing that "some in the literary world are wondering if it isn't time to start another prize altogether".

What should land in my inbox this morning but an email from the literary agent Andrew Kidd announcing the launch of a new literary prize. Kidd's announcement begins:

The Literature Prize will be for the best novel written in the English language and published in the UK in a given year, and a writer's country of origin will not be a factor. Our aim is to establish a clear and uncompromising standard of excellence, and the prize judges will be selected in rotation from an academy of experts in the field of literature.

A "clear and uncompromising standard of excellence" - now that would be something, wouldn't it? That Kidd and his supporters (John Banville, Pat Barker, Mark Haddon, Jackie Kay, Nicole Krauss and Claire Messud have all endorsed the venture) see the Literature Prize as an alternative to the Booker is made clear later on:

The prize will offer readers a selection of novels that, in the view of these expert judges, are unsurpassed in their quality and ambition. For many years this brief was fulfilled by the Booker (latterly the Man Booker) Prize. But as numerous statements by that prize's administrator and this year's judges illustrate, it now prioritises a notion of "readability" over artistic achievement.

Kidd says the new prize's advisory board are currently soliciting funding and that an announcement about this will be made soon. Watch this space.

Jonathan Derbyshire is Managing Editor of Prospect. He was formerly Culture Editor of the New Statesman.

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SRSLY #49: The Great British Sewing Bee, The Essex Serpent, The Lady Vanishes

On the pop culture podcast this week, we watch The Great British Sewing Bee, read new novel The Essex Serpent and revisit 2013's The Lady Vanishes.

This is SRSLY, the pop culture podcast from the New Statesman. Here, you can find links to all the things we talk about in the show as well as a bit more detail about who we are and where else you can find us online.

...or subscribe in iTunes. We’re also on StitcherRSS and SoundCloud – but if you use a podcast app that we’re not appearing in, let us know.

SRSLY is usually hosted by Caroline Crampton and Anna Leszkiewicz, the NS’s web editor and editorial assistant. We’re on Twitter as @c_crampton and @annaleszkie, where between us we post a heady mixture of Serious Journalism, excellent gifs and regularly ask questions J K Rowling needs to answer.

The Links

The Great British Sewing Bee

The latest series on iPlayer.

Some facts about the judges.

Caroline's favourite sewing instagram account.

The Essex Serpent

The book itself.

An interesting review by M John Harrison.

Sarah Perry on Twitter.

The Lady Vanishes

The trailer.

A good piece about the Hitchcock background to this adaptation.

For next time

Caroline is reading The Silent Woman by Janet Malcolm.

If you’d like to talk to us about the podcast or make a suggestion for something we should read or cover, you can email srslypod[at]gmail.com.

You can also find us on Twitter @srslypod, or send us your thoughts on tumblr here. If you like the podcast, we’d love you to leave a review on iTunes - this helps other people come across it.

We love reading out your emails. If you have thoughts you want to share on anything we’ve discussed, or questions you want to ask us, please email us on srslypod[at]gmail.com, or @ us on Twitter @srslypod, or get in touch via tumblr here. We also have Facebook now.

Our theme music is “Guatemala - Panama March” (by Heftone Banjo Orchestra), licensed under Creative Commons. 

See you next week!

PS If you missed #48, check it out here.