David Hare wins PEN/Pinter Prize 2011

Playwright wins prize for political writing.

David Hare has been awarded the PEN/Pinter prize for 2011. The prize was established by English PEN, which supports writers working under censorship and the threat of persecution, to draw attention to writers "of outstanding literary merit who, in the words of Harold Pinter's Nobel speech, casts an 'unflinching, unswerving' gaze upon the world, and shows a 'fierce intellectual determination ... to define the real truth of our lives and our societies'". Previous winners include Hanif Kureshi and Tony Harrison. Half of the prize will be shared with a "writer of courage" who has undergone political persecution for speaking publicly about their ideas; last year this half of the prize went to the Mexican journalist and human rights activist Lydia Cacho.

Once one of the enfant terribles of British theatre, penning a series of incendiary political plays for the Royal Court and National Theatre during the 1970s and 80s, Hare has ended up becoming a pillar of the theatrical establishment. He was given a knighthood in 1998 and his Page Eight, about an MI5 operative (Bill Nighy) chased out of his job for disclosing British complicity in torture, has become the latest in a series of works he has written for the BBC. Hare was one of the group, alongside Alan Clarke, editing Play for Today during its late 70s heyday. In a recent interview with Radio Times he said that he was glad to able to work on film and TV again, with its potentially huge audience. But it would be a mistake to think he has cooled in his politics. During the 2000s he worked on a series of "verbatim plays", using transcripts of material to examine privatisation, the lead-up to the Iraq war and the origins of the financial crisis. "13 years have gone", he has said, "and whether the plays are any good or not, they are certainly no less radical." Lady Antonia Fraser, Harold Pinter's widow and one of the prize judges, said:

In the course of his long, distinguished career, David Hare has never failed to speak out fearlessly on the subject of politics in the broadest sense; this courage, combined with his rich creative talent, makes him a worthy winner of the PEN/Pinter Prize.

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Brexit… Leg-sit

A new poem by Jo-Ella Sarich. 

Forgot Brexit. An ostrich just walked into the room. Actually,
forget ostriches too. Armadillos also have legs, and shoulder plates
like a Kardashian.  Then I walked in, the other version of me, the one
with legs like wilding pines, when all of them

are the lumberjacks. Forget forests. Carbon sinks are down
this month; Switzerland is the neutral territory
that carved out an island for itself. My body
is the battleground you sketch. My body is
the greenfield development, and you
are the heavy earthmoving equipment. Forget
the artillery in the hills
and the rooftops opening up like nesting boxes. Forget about

the arms race. Cheekbones are the new upper arms
since Michelle lost out to Melania. My cheekbones
are the Horsehead Nebula and you are the Russians
at warp speed. Race you to the finish. North Korea

will go away if you stop thinking
about it. South Korea will, too. Stop thinking
about my sternum. Stop thinking about
the intricacy of my mitochondria. Thigh gaps
are the new wage gaps, and mine is like
the space between the redwood stand
and the plane headed for the mountains. Look,

I’ve pulled up a presentation
with seven different eschatologies
you might like to try. Forget that my arms
are the yellow tape around the heritage tree. Forget
about my exoskeleton. Forget
that the hermit crab
has no shell of its own. Forget that the crab ever
walked sideways into the room.
Pay attention, people.

Jo-Ella Sarich is a New Zealand-based lawyer and poet. Her poems have appeared in the Galway Review and the Poetry New Zealand Yearbook 2017.

This article first appeared in the 17 August 2017 issue of the New Statesman, Trump goes nuclear