In the Critics this Week

T C Boyle on nature, Queen Elizabeth's face and the sins of the Empire.

In the critics' section of this week's New Statesman, Tim Adams considers Queen Elizabeth's many portraits and observes that although she possesses "perhaps the most frequently depicted features in all history, she remains faceless". Of those who have taken her photograph or painted her portrait, "[Lucian Freud] made her wear the most exposing crown... made her look almost masculine in her dourness, and the crown seems to sit anachronistically on her clayey flesh," Adams writes.

Historian Amanda Foreman reviews Running the Show: Governors of the British Empire by Stephanie Williams. It is Williams's misfortune, Foreman writes, to have written a paean to the Empire just as evidence has emerged of British abuse in Kenya, where "prisoners were routinely starved and tortured to death, but the colonial authorities knew about the abuse and even tried to cover it up". Foreman criticises Williams's "incompatibilities of tone and subject matter," arguing that "some crimes are just too great to sandwich between letters about high tea and elephant hunting". The Books Interview this week is with T C Boyle, who reflects on the presence of nature in his fiction and his indifference to modern technology. "To take a walk down the beach with your headphones in is missing the point," he suggests.

An "oppressively grisly movie... of unvarying sadism," Ryan Gilbey remarks of I Saw the Devil, directed by the Korean Kim Jee-woon, while Rachel Cooke takes on The Suspicions of Mr Whicher, an ITV period murder mystery based on Kate Summerscale's book of the same name and declares the drama "painfully stretched and slight". NS Culture editor Jonathan Derbyshire reviews The Art of the Enlightenment exhibition at the National Museum of China in Beijing, which opened just as the Chinese authorities were demonstrating the limits of their embrace of Enlightenment values with the arrest of the artist Ai Weiwei. Finally, our radio critic Antonia Quirke finds The Organist Entertains on BBC Radio 2 "as pleasantly depressing as a Cath Kidson apron".

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SRSLY #30: Awards Special

We discuss awards season’s big trio: the Oscars, the BAFTAs, and, of course, the SRSLYs.

This is SRSLY, the pop culture podcast from the New Statesman. Here, you can find links to all the things we talk about in the show as well as a bit more detail about who we are and where else you can find us online. Listen to our new episode now:

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The Links

The list of Oscar nominations.

The list of BAFTA nominations.

Charlotte Rampling's silly comments.

Kristen Stewart's slightly less silly comments.

Danny DeVito's comments.

 

Your questions:

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See you next week!

PS If you missed #29, check it out here.