Tom Ravenscroft's music blog

Listen here to the BBC 6 Music DJ's favourite new tracks, from Kenyan guitar pop to singer songwrite

I'm back from a fantastically undeserved holiday to a slightly underserved -- but very much welcome -- sack of unheard records.

The problem is, I have no idea how I am going to get through them all. I have people emailing me to ask if have listened to the records they sent and the truth is it would take me twice as long to find it as it would to listen to it.

I am also conscious that in a desperate attempt to always be listening to the latest things, the tunes in the bottom of the bag will probably be regarded as archive material by the time I reach them. If matters couldn't get worse I love the first record I heard. It's by a Kenyan guitar group, Nguuni Lovers Lovers, and the song's called "Beth Kathini" (soon to be released by Dream Beach Records). Listen to it below - I don't want to listen to anything else right now.

Nguuni Lovers Lovers - Beth Kathini by Dream Beach Records  

Oh, oh -- and my favourite new EP, by singer-songwriters Peter and Kerry, is called Clothes, Friends, Photos. It's out now and there is a free track you can download from their record label's website.

Peter and Kerry - The Summer House Song by Tape Club Records 

You listen to these, I'll carry on with this, and we'll reconvene next week.

Tom Ravenscroft's radio show is on BBC 6 Music at 9pm every Friday. He writes a monthly music column for the New Statesman and blogs here every Wednesday

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Karen Bradley as Culture Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport.

The most politically charged of the culture minister's responsibilities is overseeing the BBC, and to anyone who works for - or simply loves - the national broadcaster, Karen Bradley has one big point in her favour. She is not John Whittingdale. Her predecessor as culture secretary was notorious for his belief that the BBC was a wasteful, over-mighty organisation which needed to be curbed. And he would have had ample opportunity to do this: the BBC's Charter is due for renewal next year, and the licence fee is only fixed until 2017. 

In her previous job at the Home Office, Karen Bradley gained a reputation as a calm, low-key minister. It now seems likely that the charter renewal will be accomplished with fewer frothing editorials about "BBC bias" and more attention to the challenges facing the organisation as viewing patterns fragment and increasing numbers of viewers move online.

Of the rest of the job, the tourism part just got easier: with the pound so weak, it will be easier to attract visitors to Britain from abroad. And as for press regulation, there is no word strong enough to describe how long the grass is into which it has been kicked.

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.