Hunting for happiness

Patrick Hamilton is honoured with a blue plaque.

The novelist and playwright Patrick Hamilton, who died in 1962 aged 58, was commemorated by an English Heritage blue plaque last Saturday, installed at his birthplace in Chiswick. Best known for Hangover Square and the play Rope, later adapted for the cinema by Alfred Hitchcock, Hamilton is nevertheless largely overlooked, for many years shoved to the margins of the established literary canon.

Yet Hamilton wrote masterfully about London's "shabby genteel" in the inter-war years - depicting the quietly desperate, doomed lives of alcoholics and whores in grimy corners of the city, where greed and manipulation are masked by a drink-soaked camaraderie.

Hamilton had an ambiguous view of the city he so often depicted, a complicated mixture of fascination and repulsion. Late in life, he observed in his unfinished novel The Happy Hunting Ground that "London's a place where you're forever hunting for happiness - and even if you find it it's soon taken away from you".

The plaque at least offers a permanent memorial for a writer so preoccupied with unnoticed lives slipping away into a kind of terminal misery and whose own life, before his early death, was somewhat shambolic.

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Harry Potter Week

Celebrating 20 years of Harry Potter.

Do you know what day it is? Today is Monday 26 June 2017 – which means it’s 20 years since Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone was first published in the UK. That’s two decades of knowing and loving Harry Potter.

Here at the New Statesman, a solid 90 per cent of the online staff live and breathe Harry Potter. So we thought now would be the perfect time to run a week of Potter-themed articles. We’ve got a mix of personal reflections, very (very) geeky analysis, cultural criticism, nostalgia, and some truly bizarre fan fiction. You have been warned. 

See below for the full list, which will be updated throughout the week:

Jonn Elledge and the Young Hagrid Audition

Anna Leszkiewicz is a pop culture writer at the New Statesman.

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