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The Friday Arts Diary

Our cultural picks for the week ahead.

Film

Metropolis (Opens Nationwide, Friday 10 September)

Fritz Lang's 1927 sci-fi masterpiece has been restored and is now available in UK cinemas. Metropolis is set in 2026, when poor workers toil beneath the ground while the rich enjoy a futuristic city of luxury. The restored version includes 25 minutes of extra footage, and maintains the film's reputation as one of the most visionary and influential in history.

TV

Question Time, BBC 2 (Thursday 16 September, 10:35 pm)

David Dimbleby returns for a Labour leadership special, with the five hopefuls - Ed Miliband, David Miliband, Ed Balls, Diane Abbott and Andy Burnham - facing questions from the London audience. As voting draws to a close throughout September, this will be one of the last public debates between the candidates, with the process having been kicked off by the New Statesman's own debate back in June.

Music

End of the Road Festival, Larmer Tree Gardens, North Dorset (Friday 10 - Sunday 12 September)

The UK festival season draws to a relaxed close with the fifth instalment of the independently run festival. Living up to its reputation for showcasing the best in alternative, folk and americana music, this year's End of the Road sees peformances from Yo La Tengo, Wilco, Caribou and Iron & Wine alongside its staple comedic, cinematic and gastronomic offerings.

Exhibition

Eadweard Muybridge, Tate Britain (Until 16 January 2011)

The famed inventor of the motion camera is the subject of a compelling retrospective recently opened at the Tate Britain. Muybridge's zoopraxiscope, a method of projecting animated versions photographs as short moving sequences, anticipated future developments in photography and cinema. This exhibition, reviewed by Tim Adams in this week's New Statesman, draws together Muybridge's vast back catalogue and explores the fascinating story of the man behind the pictures.

Theatre

Birdsong, Comedy Theatre, London (Opens Saturday 18 September)

Sebastian Faulks's international best selling novel has been adapted to the stage by Rachel Wagstaff and opens next weekend in London. Directed by Trevor Nunn, the play attempts to dramatise Stephen Wraysford's journey from a love affair in pre-war France to the horror of the Battle of the Somme as a British soldier, and explores the novel's themes of generation, love and courage.