Booker shortlist announced

Tom McCarthy, Andrea Levy and Peter Carey all make the cut.

This year's Booker Prize shortlist has been announced. The six novelists up for the literary award, selected from a longlist of 13, are:

Peter Carey - Parrot and Olivier in America (Faber and Faber)

Emma Donoghue - Room (Picador - Pan Macmillan)

Damon Galgut - In a Strange Room (Atlantic Books)

Howard Jacobson - The Finkler Question (Bloomsbury)

Andrea Levy - The Long Song (Headline Review)

Tom McCarthy - C (Jonathan Cape)

Andrew Motion, chair of the judging panel, commented:

It's been a great privilege and an exciting challenge for us to reduce our longlist of thirteen to this shortlist of six outstandingly good novels. In doing so, we feel sure we've chosen books which demonstrate a rich variety of styles and themes - while in every case providing deep individual pleasures.

As we noted previously, the longlist excluded both Martin Amis and Ian McEwan, two high-profile British authors who published novels this year. Instead, the judges appear to have gone for a serious but diverse mix - from Peter Carey's "comic adventure that functions with equal brilliance as a novel of ideas", in the words of our fiction critic Leo Robson, to Tom McCarthy's excavations of 20th century European modernism, to Andrea Levy's innovative historical fiction.

Daniel Trilling is the Editor of New Humanist magazine. He was formerly an Assistant Editor at the New Statesman.

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“Minoan pendant”: a new poem by Mark Granier

“Yes – I press my nose / to the pleasantly warm glass – / it’s a copy of one I saw / cased in the cool museum”

Yes – I press my nose
to the pleasantly warm glass –
it’s a copy of one I saw
cased in the cool museum –
gold beaten to honey, a grainy
oval dollop, flanked by two
slim symmetrical bees –

garland for a civilisation’s
rise and collapse, eye-dropped
five thousand years: a flash
of evening sun on a windscreen
or wing mirror – Heraklion’s
scooter-life buzzing and humming –

as I step in to browse, become
mesmerised by the warm
dark eyes of the woman
who gives her spiel and moves
softly and with such grace,
that, after leaving, I hesitate

a moment on the pavement
then re-enter with a question
I know not to ask, but ask
anyway, to hear her voice
soften even more as she smiles
and shakes her hair – no.

Mark Granier is an Irish poet and photographer. He is the author of four collections of poetry, most recently Haunt (Salmon).

This article first appeared in the 16 June 2016 issue of the New Statesman, Britain on the brink