In The Critics this week

David Jones remembered, the start of Simon Amstell’s post-Never Mind the Buzzcocks career and Adam S

In this week's Critic at Large essay, David Wheatley makes the case for the poet and artist David Jones, whose book-length prose poem about the First World War, In Parenthesis, has just been reissued by Faber & Faber (for whom Jones was discovered, in the 1930s, by T S Eliot).

Elsewhere, Ryan Gilbey wonders what happened to François Ozon (his new film is The Refuge), Rachel Cooke is not sure if Simon Amstell, whose post-Never Mind the Buzzcocks comedy vehicle Grandma's House began on BBC2 this week, is as smart as he thinks he is, and Andrew Billen isn't convinced by climate-change drama Earthquakes in London.

In Books, the economist Diane Coyle reviews a new biography of Adam Smith, which saves the economist from his battier free-market admirers, Jonathan Derbyshire talks to James Robertson about his novel And the Land Lay Still, Leo Robson wonders if Tom McCarthy's new novel really does stake out a new direction for fiction and Vernon Bogdanor remembers the "unheroic" Clement Attlee.

Show Hide image

Poem: "When the Americans came"

“Do you have vampires around here?”

When the Americans came,

they didn’t take to our gardens:

the apple orchard smelling of wild garlic,

foxgloves growing among the runner beans.


“Do you have vampires around here?”

a visitor from Carolina asked me.

It was a shambles, Wilfred knew that,

nodding wisely as though apologising


for the ill manners of King George,

the clematis purple in the thatched roofing.

But come the softe sonne,

there are oxlips in Fry’s woods,


forget-me-nots in the shallow stream,

lettuce and spring onions for a salad.

It’s certain that fine women eat

A crazy salad with their meat*


I tried to tell them. But they weren’t women,

and didn’t care to listen to a boy.

They preferred the red rosehips

we used for making wine.


Danced outside the village church

round the maypole Jack Parnham made.

Now they’re gone,

the wild garlic has returned.


* W B Yeats, “A Prayer for My Daughter”


William Bedford is a novelist, children’s author and poet. His eighth collection of verse, The Bread Horse, is published by Red Squirrel Press.

This article first appeared in the 20 October 2016 issue of the New Statesman, Brothers in blood