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In The Critics this week

David Jones remembered, the start of Simon Amstell’s post-Never Mind the Buzzcocks career and Adam S

In this week's Critic at Large essay, David Wheatley makes the case for the poet and artist David Jones, whose book-length prose poem about the First World War, In Parenthesis, has just been reissued by Faber & Faber (for whom Jones was discovered, in the 1930s, by T S Eliot).

Elsewhere, Ryan Gilbey wonders what happened to François Ozon (his new film is The Refuge), Rachel Cooke is not sure if Simon Amstell, whose post-Never Mind the Buzzcocks comedy vehicle Grandma's House began on BBC2 this week, is as smart as he thinks he is, and Andrew Billen isn't convinced by climate-change drama Earthquakes in London.

In Books, the economist Diane Coyle reviews a new biography of Adam Smith, which saves the economist from his battier free-market admirers, Jonathan Derbyshire talks to James Robertson about his novel And the Land Lay Still, Leo Robson wonders if Tom McCarthy's new novel really does stake out a new direction for fiction and Vernon Bogdanor remembers the "unheroic" Clement Attlee.