David Foster Wallace: journalist or novelist?

Who are the best practitioners of long-form magazine journalism?

Here's an interesting exercise designed to while away the dog days of August. Kevin Kelly at the Cool Tools website has assembled a list of the "best magazine articles ever" (by which he means "long-form" pieces), and is soliciting suggestions from readers. Though Kelly's list goes all the way back to Hazlitt, who more or less invented the form, and includes pieces by English writers such as James Fenton and Louis de Bernières, it is preponderantly American in focus. Parochialism is no doubt partly to blame for that, but it is also true that the Americans do the long form so much better than anyone else -- or at least that they have more opportunities to practice it, for there are simply more venues available in the US for this sort of thing than anywhere else.

Kelly has settled on a top seven, based on the number of times articles have been recommended.

1. David Foster Wallace, "Federer as Religious Experience." The New York Times, Play magazine, 20 August, 2006.

2. David Foster Wallace, "Consider the Lobster." Gourmet Magazine, August 2004.

3. Neal Stephenson, "Mother Earth, Mother Board: Wiring the Planet." Wired, December 1996.

4. Gay Talese, "Frank Sinatra Has a Cold." Esquire, April 1966.

5. Ron Rosenbaum, "Secrets of the Little Blue Box." Esquire, October 1971.

6. Jon Krakauer, "Death of an Innocent: How Christopher McCandless Lost his Way in the Wilds." Outside Magazine, January 1993.

7. Edward Jay Epstein, "Have You Ever Tried to Sell a Diamond?" Atlantic Magazine, February 1982.

No surprise to see David Foster Wallace well-represented in that list. Indeed, much of his journalism -- most of it collected in two essential volumes (A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again and Consider the Lobster) -- will probably outlast his novels (if not his short stories).

Jonathan Derbyshire is Managing Editor of Prospect. He was formerly Culture Editor of the New Statesman.

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Katy Perry just saved the Brits with a parody of Donald Trump and Theresa May

Our sincerest thanks to the pop star for bringing one fleeting moment of edge to a very boring awards show.

Now, your mole cannot claim to be an expert on the cutting edge of culture, but if there’s one thing we can all agree on in 2017, it’s that the Brit Awards are more old hat than my press cap. 

Repeatedly excluding the genres and artists that make British music genuinely innovative, the Brits instead likes to spend its time rewarding such dangerous up-and-coming acts as Robbie Williams. And it’s hosted by Dermot O’Leary.

Which is why the regular audience must have been genuinely baffled to see a hint of political edge entering the ceremony this year. Following an extremely #makeuthink music video released earlier this week, Katy Perry took to the stage to perform her single “Chained to the Rhythm” amongst a sea of suburban houses. Your mole, for one, doesn’t think there are enough model villages at popular award ceremonies these days.

But while Katy sang of “stumbling around like a wasted zombie”, and her house-clad dancers fell off the edge of the stage, two enormous skeleton puppets entered the performance in... familiar outfits.

As our Prime Minister likes to ask, remind you of anyone?

How about now?

Wow. Satire.

The mole would like to extend its sincerest lukewarm thanks to Katy Perry for bringing one fleeting moment of edge to one of the most vanilla, status-quo-preserving awards ceremonies in existence. 

I'm a mole, innit.