Booker longlist announced

Novels by Tom McCarthy, Rose Tremain and David Mitchell are nominated for the literary prize, but Am

This year's Booker Prize longlist has been announced. The novels that made the list, plus links to NS reviews and coverage, are:

Peter Carey Parrot and Oliver in America (Faber and Faber)

Emma Donoghue Room (Pan MacMillan -- Picador)

Helen Dunmore The Betrayal (Penguin -- Fig Tree)

Damon Galgut In a Strange Room (Grove Atlantic -- Atlantic Books)

Howard Jacobson The Finkler Question (Bloomsbury) -- this will be reviewed by Leo Robson in Thursday's magazine

Andrea Levy The Long Song (Headline Publishing Group -- Headline Review)

Tom McCarthy C (Random House - Jonathan Cape)

David Mitchell The Thousand Autumns of Zacob de Zoet (Hodder & Stoughton -- Sceptre)

Lisa Moore February (Random House -- Chatto & Windus)

Paul Murray Skippy Dies (Penguin -- Hamish Hamilton)

Rose Tremain Trespass (Random House -- Chatto & Windus)

Christos Tsiolkas The Slap (Grove Atlantic -- Tuskar Rock)

Alan Warner The Stars in the Bright Sky (Random House -- Jonathan Cape)

Andrew Motion, chair of the judging panel, said:

Here are 13 exceptional novels -- books we have chosen for their intrinsic quality, without reference to the past work of their authors. Wide-ranging in their geography and their concern, they tell powerful stories which make the familiar strange and cover an enormous range of history and feeling. We feel confident that they will provoke and entertain.

The first sentence of Motion's statement is particularly striking, given that the judges chose not to longlist the recent efforts from two of Britain's best-known novelists -- Ian McEwan and Martin Amis.

Daniel Trilling is the Editor of New Humanist magazine. He was formerly an Assistant Editor at the New Statesman.

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SRSLY #13: Take Two

On the pop culture podcast this week, we discuss Michael Fassbender’s Macbeth, the recent BBC adaptations of Lady Chatterley’s Lover and Cider with Rosie, and reminisce about teen movie Shakespeare retelling She’s the Man.

This is SRSLY, the pop culture podcast from the New Statesman. Here, you can find links to all the things we talk about in the show as well as a bit more detail about who we are and where else you can find us online.

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SRSLY is hosted by Caroline Crampton and Anna Leszkiewicz, the NS’s web editor and editorial assistant. We’re on Twitter as @c_crampton and @annaleszkie, where between us we post a heady mixture of Serious Journalism, excellent gifs and regularly ask questions J K Rowling needs to answer.

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The Links

On Macbeth

Ryan Gilbey’s review of Macbeth.

The trailer for the film.

The details about the 2005 Macbeth from the BBC’s Shakespeare Retold series.


On Lady Chatterley’s Lover and Cider with Rosie

Rachel Cooke’s review of Lady Chatterley’s Lover.

Sarah Hughes on Cider with Rosie, and the BBC’s attempt to create “heritage television for the Downton Abbey age”.


On She’s the Man (and other teen movie Shakespeare retellings)

The trailer for She’s the Man.

The 27 best moments from the film.

Bim Adewunmi’s great piece remembering 10 Things I Hate About You.


Next week:

Anna is reading Lolly Willowes by Sylvia Townsend Warner.


Your questions:

We loved talking about your recommendations and feedback this week. If you have thoughts you want to share on anything we've discussed, or questions you want to ask us, please email us on srslypod[at], or @ us on Twitter @srslypod, or get in touch via tumblr here. We also have Facebook now.



The music featured this week, in order of appearance, is:


Our theme music is “Guatemala - Panama March” (by Heftone Banjo Orchestra), licensed under Creative Commons. 



See you next week!

PS If you missed #12, check it out here.

Caroline Crampton is web editor of the New Statesman.

Anna Leszkiewicz is the New Statesman's editorial assistant.