This weekend: Museums at Night

Venues across the country will be open after hours in a celebration of history and heritage.

Readers with an evening spare this weekend would do well to visit one of the 300 museums and galleries participating in this year's Museums at Night scheme, an annual UK-wide celebration of all things cultural.

Introduced after the success of the Paris-conceived Nuit européenne des musées -- now in its sixth year -- the UK scheme will run from 14 to 16 May and includes tours, talks and workshop events at heritage sites throughout the country.

London highlights include a screening of Alfred Hitchcock films at the Victoria and Albert Museum, a curator-led tour of the London Transport Museum and a class on stitching at the the Royal College of Surgeons' Hunterian Museum, taught by practising surgeons.

Elsewhere, the Eden Project in Cornwall will host a night of sound installation, storytelling and musical performance inside its artificial biomes. In Norwich, a torchlit tour of the cathedral will take place, and a "silent disco" (dancing with headphones on) will be held at Tate Liverpool.

A full listing of events can be found on the culture24 website.

Nasa
Show Hide image

On Wheels

A new poem by Patrick Mackie

The hills swarm and soften towards the end of the day just as
flames do in a fireplace as the evening
loosens and breaks open and lets out night.
A nasty, grotesque, impatient year ended,
and the new one will be bitter,
tired, opaque. Words wrangle in every inch of air,
their mouths wide open in stupid shock
at what they have just heard every time they hear anything. Venus,
though, blazes with heavy wobbles of albeit frozen
light. Brecht, who I like to call my
brother just as he called Shelley his,
has a short late poem where he sits by a roadside, waiting
while someone changes the wheel on his car,
watching with impatience, despite not liking
either the place that he is coming from or
the place that he is going to. We call it
connectivity when in truth it is just aggression
and imitation writ ever larger. Poems, though,
are forms of infinite and wry but also briskly
impatient patience. Brecht’s poem seems to end,
for instance, almost before you
can read it. It wheels. The goddess is just a big, bright
wilderness but then soon enough she clothes
herself again in the openness of night and I lose her.

Patrick Mackie’s latest collection, The Further Adventures Of The Lives Of The Saints, is published by CB Editions.

This article first appeared in the 18 May 2017 issue of the New Statesman, Age of Lies

0800 7318496