J G Farrell and the last gasp of the British empire

NS critics on the winner of the Lost Man Booker Prize.

As the reading season approaches, one book readers might not have thought to pack on holiday, but which would well deserve their leisure time, is J G Farrell's Troubles (Phoenix), which was this week declared the winner of the Lost Man Booker Prize, a one-off award for the best books of 1970 -- never considered for the Booker because of a change in the rules that year.

Set on the east coast of Ireland in 1919 -- the eve of the Irish war of independence -- Troubles tells the tragicomic story of Major Brendan Archer, recently discharged from the British army, who visits a down-at-heel hotel, the Majestic, in the hope of finding a woman he is convinced must be his fiancée.

Troubles was the first of what became known as Farrell's "Empire trilogy", a series of novels that explored the decline of the British empire. Writing in the New Statesman in 1999, Tony Gould recalled Farrell's long-standing preoccupation with the subject:

"It seemed to me," [Farrell] once said, "that the really interesting thing that's happened during my lifetime has been the decline of the British empire." He also remarked that "being half Irish and half English I'm able to look at the same thing from both sides -- from that of the colonist and the colonised".

His work was also saluted in the NS by the literary critic Christopher Tayler, who wrote:

Farrell's writing is well worth rediscovering. Sardonic, generous, eccentric and sad, it seems as original now as it must have done in the 1970s, before successive waves of historical and post-colonial fiction dampened the memory of Farrell's achievements in this line. His "trilogy" is concerned with the gap between imperial ideals and imperial practice -- with the idea that "a nation", as one of his characters comes to suspect, "does not create itself according to its own best ideas, but is shaped by other forces, of which it has little knowledge". Yet the novels are never earnest or pompous. On the contrary, they are often extremely funny, combining vivid historical backdrops with an ironic, absurd sense of humour pitched somewhere between P G Wodehouse and Samuel Beckett.

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SRSLY #94: Liam Payne / Kimmy Schmidt / Mulholland Drive

On the pop culture podcast this week: the debut solo single from Liam Payne, the Netflix series The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt and the David Lynch film Mulholland Drive.

This is SRSLY, the pop culture podcast from the New Statesman. Here, you can find links to all the things we talk about in the show as well as a bit more detail about who we are and where else you can find us online.

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SRSLY is hosted by Caroline Crampton and Anna Leszkiewicz, the NS’s assistant editor and editorial assistant. We’re on Twitter as @c_crampton and @annaleszkie, where between us we post a heady mixture of Serious Journalism, excellent gifs and regularly ask questions J K Rowling needs to answer.

The Links

Liam Payne

The lyrics. Oh God, the lyrics.

The interview that Caroline mentioned, feat. Ed Sheeran anecdote.

Liam on the trending chart.

The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt

The show on Netflix.

Why the show needs to end.

The GOAT, Emily Nussbaum, on the show.

Mulholland Drive

Lynch's ten clues to unlocking the film.

Everything you were afraid to ask about Mulholland Drive.

Vanity Fair goes inside the making of the film.

For next time:

We are watching Loaded.

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See you next week!

PS If you missed #93, check it out here.

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