The greatest political movies - the longlist

Do you agree with our staff picks?

Next issue's Critics will be a film special, so in honour of this we have conducted a completely un-scientific poll of NS staff to find the greatest political movies. "Political" was taken in its broadest sense - the only stipulation being no documentaries. You'll have to wait until Thursday's magazine to find out the top ten, but for now here's the longlist.

Tell us in the comments thread below: which films have we missed out? And what would make your top ten?

 

All the President's Men dir: Alan J. Pakula (1976)

Battleship Potemkin dir: Sergei Eisenstein (1926)

Casablanca dir: Michael Curtiz (1942)

Chinatown dir: Roman Polanski (1974)

Do the Right Thing dir: Spike Lee (1989)

Downfall dir: Oliver Hirschbiegel (2005)

Dr Strangelove dir: Stanley Kubrick (1964)

Godzilla dir: Ishirō Honda (1954)

Gomorra dir: Matteo Garrone (2008)

Goodbye, Lenin dir: Wolfgang Becker (2003)

Hunger dir: Steve McQueen (2008)

In the Loop dir: Armando Iannucci (2009)

Independence Day dir: Roland Emmerich (1996)

Kadosh dir: Amos Gitai (1999)

La Chinoise dir: Jean-Luc Godard (1967)

La Haine dir: Mathieu Kassovitz (1995)

La Planete Sauvage dir: René Laloux (1973)

Land and Freedom dir: Ken Loach (1995)

Lone Star dir: John Sayles (1996)

Meantime dir: Mike Leigh (1984)

Milk dir: Gus Van Sant (2008)

Mr Smith Goes to Washington dir: Frank Capra (1939)

My Beautiful Laundrette dir: Stephen Frears (1985)

Nashville dir: Robert Altman (1975)

Persepolis dir: directed by Marjane Satrapi and Vincent Paronnaud (2007)

Platoon dir: Oliver Stone (1986)

Pratidwandi (The Adversary) dir: Satyajit Ray (1971)

Salò or the 120 Days of Sodom dir: Pier Paolo Pasolini (1975)

Strawberry and Chocolate dir: Tomás Gutiérrez Alea (1968)

Team America: World Police dir: Trey Parker (2005)

The Battle of Algiers dir: Gillo Pontecorvo (1967)

The Candidate dir: Michael Ritchie (1972)

The Conformist dir: Bernardo Bertolucci (1970)

The Last of England dir: Derek Jarman (1988)

The Lives of Others dir: Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck (2006)

The Trial dir: Orson Welles (1962)

W dir: Oliver Stone (2008)

Waltz With Bashir dir: Ari Folman (2008)

Xala dir: Ousmane Sembene (1975)

Z dir: Costa Gavros (1969)

 

 

GETTY
Show Hide image

Why Prince Charles and Princess Anne are both wrong on GM foods

The latest tiff between toffs gives plenty of food for thought.

I don’t have siblings, so I was weirdly curious as a kid about friends who did, especially when they argued (which was often). One thing I noticed was the importance of superlatives: of being the best child, the most right, and the first to have been wronged. And it turns out things are no different for the Royals.

You might think selective breeding would be a subject on which Prince Charles and Princess Anne would share common ground, but when it comes to genetically modified crops they have very different opinions.

According to Princess Anne, the UK should ditch its concerns about GM and give the technology the green light. In an interview to be broadcast on Radio 4’s Farming Today, she said would be keen to raise both modified crops and livestock on her own land.

“Most of us would argue we have been genetically modifying food since man started to be agrarian,” she said (rallying the old first-is-best argument to her cause). She also argued that the practice can help reduce the price of our food and improve the lives of animals - and “suspects” that there are not many downsides.

Unfortunately for Princess Anne, her Royal “us” does not include her brother Charles, who thinks that GM is The Worst.

In 2008, he warned that genetically engineered food “will be guaranteed to cause the biggest disaster environmentally of all time.”  Supporting such a path would risk handing control of our food-chain to giant corporations, he warned -  leading to “absolute disaster” and “unmentionable awfulness” and “the absolute destruction of everything”.

Normally such a spat could be written off as a toff-tiff. But with Brexit looming, a change to our present ban on growing GM crops commercially looks ever more likely.

In this light, the need to swap rhetoric for reason is urgent. And the most useful anti-GM argument might instead be that offered by the United Nations’ cold, hard data on crop yields.

Analysis by the New York Times shows that, in comparison to Europe, the United States and Canada have “gained no discernible advantages” from their use of GM (in terms of food per acre). Not only this, but herbicide use in the US has increased rather than fallen.

In sum: let's swap superlatives and speculation for sense.

India Bourke is an environment writer and editorial assistant at the New Statesman.