What's the greatest political photograph?

Help us choose the 50 best political photographs over the past century.

"A picture is worth a thousand words", so goes the saying. To mark the outstanding contribution of photojournalism over the last century, The New Statesman is publishing a special collector's edition of the 50 best political photographs.

The final images will be chosen by a panel of expert judges and announced in our Easter bumper issue, out on 30 March.

We would like to invite you to participate by submitting your favourite political photos. Nominations should capture a political moment in time. We're looking for iconic and historically important photographs of either a major political event, such as Martin Luther King's "I have a dream" speech or iconic portraits of a politician such as the Alberto Korda portrait of Che Guevara. Those selected will be published in the magazine.

Submissions don't have to come from party politics -- it could be an event of social significance, or of a speech, assassination, inauguration or rally -- any date, any country. Or something more imaginative, such as a great political fake or doctored image that caused a storm, from Stalinist propaganda to the spoof image of Sarah Palin sporting an American flag bikini.

Please take a look at a flavour of our favourites below. Now tell us what yours are? Which ones might we miss?

Just email us back with the details of your suggestion to picturedesk@newstatesman.co.uk with a few words on why you are nominating it -- and attach a jpeg if you can -- by Tuesday 16 March. Alternatively, leave a comment below.

 

The Red Flag over the Reichstag (Ukrainian photographer Yevgeny Khaldei)

 

 

Quang Duc, a Buddhist monk, burns himself to death on a Saigon street on 11 June 1963 to protest alleged persecution of Buddhists by the South Vietnamese government. (Associated Press/Malcolm Browne)

 

The Reverend Martin Luther King Jr's "I Have a Dream" speech during the March on Washington DC, on 28 August 1963. (Associated Press)

 

1960 portrait of Che Guevara by Alberto Korda

 

 

Show Hide image

SRSLY #52: New Blood / Absolutely Fabulous / Bewitched

On the pop culture podcast this week: Anthony Horowitz police procedural New Blood, the Absolutely Fabulous movie and the 2005 film Bewitched by Nora Ephron.

This is SRSLY, the pop culture podcast from the New Statesman. Here, you can find links to all the things we talk about in the show as well as a bit more detail about who we are and where else you can find us online.

Listen using the player below...

...or subscribe in iTunes. We’re also on StitcherRSS and SoundCloud – but if you use a podcast app that we’re not appearing in, let us know.

SRSLY is usually hosted by Caroline Crampton and Anna Leszkiewicz, the NS’s web editor and editorial assistant. We’re on Twitter as @c_crampton and @annaleszkie, where between us we post a heady mixture of Serious Journalism, excellent gifs and regularly ask questions J K Rowling needs to answer.

The Links

New Blood

Anna on the show's pitch-perfect portrayal of millennial life in London.

Huw Fullerton on New Blood's obsession with property.

Absolutely Fabulous

The trailer for the movie.

An interesting take on the way the show and now the film charts the evolution of celebrity.

Bewitched

The trailer.

An example of the universally negative critical reaction to the film.

 

For next time

Caroline is reading Ask Polly columns, like this one.

If you’d like to talk to us about the podcast or make a suggestion for something we should read or cover, you can email srslypod[at]gmail.com.

You can also find us on Twitter @srslypod, or send us your thoughts on tumblr here. If you like the podcast, we’d love you to leave a review on iTunes - this helps other people come across it.

We love reading out your emails. If you have thoughts you want to share on anything we’ve discussed, or questions you want to ask us, please email us on srslypod[at]gmail.com, or @ us on Twitter @srslypod, or get in touch via tumblr here. We also have Facebook now.

Our theme music is “Guatemala - Panama March” (by Heftone Banjo Orchestra), licensed under Creative Commons. 

See you next week!

PS If you missed #51, check it out here.