Shlomo Sand in conversation with the New Statesman

The Invention of the Jewish People

This coming Monday, 9 November, I'll be chairing an "In conversation with the New Statesman" event at Borders, on the Charing Cross Road in London, with Professor Shlomo Sand, author of The Invention of the Jewish People, and Denis MacShane MP. The discussion begins at 6.30pm and admission is free. I do hope as many readers as possible are able to make it.

Here is what the publisher, Verso, says about Sand's book:

The Israelites were never exiled from the Promised Land -- and therefore have no right to return. And the present-day Palestinian Arabs are the true heirs of the biblical Jews. So finds Professor Shlomo Sand in the book that sent shock waves across Israeli society.

"I could not have gone on living in Israel without writing this book. I don't think books can change the world -- but when the world begins to change, it searches for different books." Shlomo Sand

After nearly two years on Israel's bestseller list, its translation into more than a dozen languages and winning France's coveted Aujourd'hui Award -- given by journalists to the best work of historical or political non-fiction -- The Invention of the Jewish People is finally available in English.

 

Jonathan Derbyshire is Managing Editor of Prospect. He was formerly Culture Editor of the New Statesman.

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“Minoan pendant”: a new poem by Mark Granier

“Yes – I press my nose / to the pleasantly warm glass – / it’s a copy of one I saw / cased in the cool museum”

Yes – I press my nose
to the pleasantly warm glass –
it’s a copy of one I saw
cased in the cool museum –
gold beaten to honey, a grainy
oval dollop, flanked by two
slim symmetrical bees –

garland for a civilisation’s
rise and collapse, eye-dropped
five thousand years: a flash
of evening sun on a windscreen
or wing mirror – Heraklion’s
scooter-life buzzing and humming –

as I step in to browse, become
mesmerised by the warm
dark eyes of the woman
who gives her spiel and moves
softly and with such grace,
that, after leaving, I hesitate

a moment on the pavement
then re-enter with a question
I know not to ask, but ask
anyway, to hear her voice
soften even more as she smiles
and shakes her hair – no.

Mark Granier is an Irish poet and photographer. He is the author of four collections of poetry, most recently Haunt (Salmon).

This article first appeared in the 16 June 2016 issue of the New Statesman, Britain on the brink