Conservative conference lookahead | 05 October 2011

The who, when and where of the Conservative conference.

Look out for:

Prime Minister David Cameron will address the Tory conference at 14:30. He will talk about the "anxious time", in which we find ourselves at present, but try to encourage voters by saying that the economy can still be lifted out of its current state.

Despite the job losses, high housing prices and austerity measures, he will say that British people should not be weighted down by "gloom and fear". Taking India and China as an example, Cameron will talk of finding the "Spirit of Britain", a home-grown formula for economic success.
"I am here to tell you that is not true. If we correct the mistakes and take on the vested interests of the past, I know we can turn this ship around," he will say.

The prime minister will speak of the need to deal with the European crisis and then dealing with the reduction of Britain's own deficit. As reported by the BBC, he will address the issue of the UK's deficit reduction by saying:

"This was no normal recession; we're in a debt crisis. It was caused by too much borrowing, by individuals, businesses, banks and - most of all - governments.

"The only way out of a debt crisis is to deal with your debts. That means households - all of us - paying off the credit card and store card bills."

In an uplifting note to end the party conference, Cameron will argue that the government will provide the people with strong leadership and that they continue their work to stabilise the country's economy. "Slowly, but surely", he will say, "we're laying the foundations for a better future".

Signs of Trouble

Cameron's speech will be an acknowledgement that the UK has not seen the end of the economic crisis. The instability in the Euro area requires the immediate attention of the European governments, as Greece's bailout is still being discussed and Italy's downgrading by the credit rating agency Moody's, has created further turmoil. The question that lies on everybody's lips is whether the Eurozone will survive in its current form and what knock-on effects there will be on the UK.

The prime minister's speech will also be overshadowed by a ComRes poll for ITV, shows that over half the voters described Cameron's leadership in economic matters and in his role in the Euro crisis as "fairly" or "very poor". Voter did however grade him positively on his statesman-like manner and his handling of the riots this summer.

Conference Timetable

10.00 - Policy forum
11.15 - Debate on defence and foreign policy with a speech by Defence Secretary Liam Fox
14.30 - Speech by Prime Minister David Cameron

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The section on climate change has already disappeared from the White House website

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Here's what the page looked like on January 1st:

And here's what it looks like now that Donald Trump is president:

The perfect summary of Trump's attitude to global warming.

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This mole tries to avoid dramatics, but really: are we all doomed?

I'm a mole, innit.