Ed Miliband's Labour conference speech - live blog

Minute-by-minute coverage of the Labour leader's speech to delegates.

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3.27: "The promise of Britain lies in its people. The tragedy of Britain is that it is not being met." Miliband's speech ends with a standing ovation.

3.24: Those ill-thought out election posters are still haunting Cameron. Miliband recalls them: "No more top-down reorganisation of the NHS". Big applause as Miliband intones: "You can't trust the Tories on the National Health Service".

3.22: "We must take on the vested interests wherever they are, because that is how we defend the public interest." Big cheers as he speaks of the need to defend the NHS against the government. Interesting that he is referring to this as a "Tory government" rather than "Tory-led" as previously.

3.18: He's talking now about rewarding responsibility in the welfare system. He is saying that hard workers are the ones who will lose out from the governments' reforms (through tax credits and sickness benefit). Sounds like he is trying to out-Tory the Tories: "while those who do the right thing are hit hard, the demands on those who don't work aren't tough enough".

3.16: Miliband is taking issue with the Conservatives' "we're all in this together" mantra. It's eloquently put and worth quoting at length:

Have you noticed how uncomfortable David Cameron is when he has to talk about responsibility at the very top?

He found it easy to be tough on you. VAT went up. He called it a tough decision. Tax credits were cut. He said they couldn't be afforded. Help paying for childcare was hit. He said it was the only thing he could do.

When you have had to pay, it's always necessary, it's always permanent, it can never be reversed. And yet at the same time they are straining at the leash to cut the 50p tax rate for people earning over £3,000 a week.

Only David Cameron could believe that you make ordinary families work harder by making them poorer and you make the rich work harder by making them richer.

3.13: Safe to say there is no love lost between Miliband and the Lib Dem leader. "It wouldn't be responsible to make promises I can't keep. That's Nick Clegg's job." Revenge for Clegg's comment about him and Balls being the "backroom boys" in the Treasury during the last government.

3.12: Interesting that he refers to young people "doing the right thing" -- I remember hearing that phrase a lot at the Tory conference last year.

3.11: Slightly stuttering delivery there, but the message is the same: "The wealth of our nation is built by the hands not just of the elite few but every man and woman who goes out and does a day's work."

3.10: Miliband is criticising the dominance of the big energy firms -- "a rigged market". This is in keeping with his strategy of presenting himself as the champion of everyman/the consumer.

3.09: Cheap gag about Nick Clegg being a Tory: "You know, the boundary review means his seat will be represented by a Tory after the next election.No change there then."

3.07: "When I am Prime Minister..." - confident!

3.06: Big cheers as he criticises "asset strippers" and calls for a new way of doing business. He particularly calls out the private equity firm involved with Southern Cross.

3.03: Miliband will be glad that the earlier blip with the TV live-streams was sorted out in time for this segment on bashing the bankers. He is saying that the financial services industry is too dominant and must change, and calling for a return to real manufacturing. "Not financial engineering but real engineering" -- it's a good line.

2.59: "Twenty-first century Britain, still a country for the insiders." This is the message that Miliband is hoping will resonate with the wider public. He's trying to make the social democratic message into something easy to relate to. "So this is who I am. The heritage of the outsider. The vantage point of the insider. The guy who is determined to break the closed circles of Britain."

2.58: National hate figure Fred Goodwin is getting it: "Fred Goodwin shouldn't have got that salary. And I tell you something else: We shouldn't have given Sir Fred Goodwin that knighthood either." Good to hear a Labour figure finally apologising for that knighthood.

2.56: This is the key part of Miliband's speech. He's criticising the double standard in values applied to big companies/vested interests and those applied to ordinary people. The notion of "trickle-down economics" is being questioned.

2.52: Miliband has moved on to the riots. Most of the people who live in the affected areas are decent, law-abiding people, says Miliband, and more were involved with the clean up than the riots. "I'm not with the Prime Minister, I will never write off whole parts of our country by calling them sick." Powerful line.

2.45: Big cheers on the importance of taking risks and adjusting to leadership: "I'm not Tony Blair. I'm not Gordon Brown either... I'm my own man and I'm going to do things my own way." He's been pushing this message in the last few days.

2.43: Miliband is referring to the Millie Dowler phone-hacking revelation as a turning point. "That's why I had to speak out." He (and the rest of his camp) are very proud of his reaction to that.

2.42: "There is an alternative," he repeats. This alternative includes reversing the VAT rise, and looking at youth unemployment. "Protecting our economy matters more than protecting a plan that has failed".

2.41: He's drawing a distinction with the government on growth: Labour is worried about it and the government isn't.

2.39: "I am determined to prove that the next Labour government will spend only what it can afford". This is probably as close as Miliband will come to the apology that many have been calling for. He reiterates the point Balls made that every penny made from the sale of bank shares will go towards repaying the debt.

2.38: We're onto the serious stuff now. He sets the scene of the global crisis and the lack of growth in Britain. "I am determined we restore your trust in us on the economy".

2.37: He's on fire! More jokes - this time about his deviated sceptum. "Typical Labour leader.He gets elected and everything moves to the centre.".

2.34: Miliband has taken to the stage. "It's been a busy year for me," he says, and starts by thanking his wife Justine, in what has become something of a conference tradition. Big laughs and cheers for his comments about his marriage: "Look, it's 2011, get over it." He makes another joke about his sons: "A new generation of Miliband brothers. Me and Justine are hoping they become doctors".

2.15pm: Ed Miliband will be addressing the Labour Party conference shortly.

Samira Shackle is a freelance journalist, who tweets @samirashackle. She was formerly a staff writer for the New Statesman.

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Interview: Momentum’s vice chair Jackie Walker on unity, antisemitism, and discipline in Labour

The leading pro-Corbyn campaigner sets out her plan for the party.

As Jeremy Corbyn’s supporters celebrate after his second win, Jackie Walker – vice chair of the pro-Corbyn campaign organisation Momentum, a Labour member and an activist – talks about the result and the next steps for Labour’s membership.

Walker is a controversial figure in the party. Her history as a black anti-racism activist and advocate for Palestine, and her Jewish background on both sides of her family, did not keep her from being accused of antisemitism for a February Facebook post about the African slave trade. In May, she was suspended from the Labour party for her comments, only to be reinstated a few weeks later after a meeting of Labour’s National Executive Committee.

Anger was reignited at an event hosted by Momentum that she spoke at during Labour party conference, on whether Labour has an antisemitism problem. Walker said the problem was “exaggerated” by Corbyn’s critics, and used as a “weapon of political mass destruction” by the media. (We spoke to Walker before this debate took place).

After a summer plagued by suspensions of Labour members, accusations of hateful speech on both sides, and calls for civility, Walker discusses what steps need to be taken forward to help bring the party together.

Jeremy Corbyn spoke in his acceptance speech about wiping the slate clean and the need to unite the party. What steps can members from all sides take to unite the party?

I think people have got to stop using antagonistic language with each other, and I think they’ve got to stop looking for ways to undermine the democratic will of the membership. That has now been plainly stated, and that’s even with something like 120,000 members not getting their vote because of the freeze. He has increased his majority – we all need to acknowledge that.

Is there anything that Corbyn’s supporters need to do – or need not to do – to contribute towards unity?

I can’t speak for the whole of Jeremy’s supporters, who are numbered in their hundreds and thousands; I know that in my Labour group, we are always bending over backwards to be friendly and to try and be positive in all of our meetings. So I think we just have to keep on being that – continue trying to win people over by and through our responses.

I was knocking doors for Labour last week in support of a local campaign protesting the planned closure of several doctors’ surgeries – I spoke to a voter on a door who said that they love the Labour party but felt unable to vote for us as long as Corbyn is leader. What should we say to voters like that?

The first thing I do is to ask them why they feel that way; most of the time, what I find is that they’ve been reading the press, which has been rabid about Jeremy Corbyn. In all the research that we and others have done, the British public agree overwhelmingly with the policies espoused by Jeremy Corbyn, so we’ve got to get on the doorstep and start talking about policies. I think that sometimes what happens in constituency Labour party groups is that people are saying “go out there and canvass but don’t mention Jeremy”. I think that we need to do the opposite – we need to go out there and talk about Jeremy and his policies all the time.

Now that Corbyn has a stronger mandate and we’ve had these two programmes on Momentum: Channel 4’s Dispatches and BBC’s Panorama, which were explanations of the group, Momentum’s role will be pivotal. How can Momentum contribute towards party unity and get its membership out on the doorstep?

I think we have to turn our base into an activist base that goes out there and starts campaigning – and doesn’t just campaign during elections but campaigns all the time, outside election time. We have to do the long campaign.

The Corbyn campaign put out a video that was subsequently withdrawn – it had been condemned by the pressure group the Campaign Against Antisemitism, which has filed a disciplinary complaint against him. What are your thoughts on the video?

I find their use of accusations of antisemitism reprehensible – I am an anti-racist campaigner and I think they debase the whole debate around anti-racism and I think they should be ashamed of themselves. There is nothing wrong with that video that anyone could look at it and say this is antisemitic. I would suggest that if people have doubt, they should look at the video and judge for themselves whether it is antisemitic.

There’s been a compliance process over the last several months that’s excluded people from the party for comments on social media. Now that Corbyn is in again, how should compliance change?

One of the issues is that we have gotten Jeremy back in as leader, but control of the NEC is still under question. Until the NEC actually accepts the recommendations of Chakrabati in terms of the workings of disciplinary procedures, then I think we’re going to be forever embroiled in these kinds of convoluted and strange disciplinary processes that no other political party would either have or put up with.

There have been rumours that Corbyn’s opponents will split from the party, or mount another leadership challenge. What do you think they’ll do?

I have absolutely no idea – there are so many permutations about how this game could now be played – and I say game because I think that there are some who are Jeremy’s opponents who kind of see it as a power game. I read a tweet somewhere saying that the purpose of this leadership election – which has damaged Labour hugely – has nothing to do with the idea that actually Owen Smith, his challenger, could have won, but is part of the process to actually undermine Jeremy. I think people like that should really think again about why they’re in the Labour party and what it is they’re doing.

Margaret Corvid is a writer, activist and professional dominatrix living in the south west.