What Samsung and Special-K taught us about social capital this week

The week's social media lessons.

This week's do's and don'ts:

Tech giants, do follow Samsung's lead and reward cheeky requests from loyal customers with priceless one-of-a-kind freebies. It makes you look like merry pagan gods bestowing favour on mortal whims. Do also, however, work out a strategy for what to do once you’ve suggested that people can basically use crap pictures of animals as currency. Or fight to change the world economy to actually work along those lines. It would make business blogging much more entertaining, at least.

Speaking of meaningless currency: cereal magnates, don't do what Special-K did and say you’ll give people crisps for tweets, then belittle them by insisting on having review of copy on said tweets before handing over your sad little bags. In doing so you’re not using tweets as currency - you’re just bribing people to hollowly endorse you. With crisps. And while you’re at it, don’t forget that people can delete their tweets as soon as they’ve licked the salty dust from their fingers. Can’t do that with coins, can they?   

Free crisps: a mixed blessing? Photograph: Getty Images

By day, Fred Crawley is editor of Credit Today and Insolvency Today. By night, he reviews graphic novels for the New Statesman.

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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.