Richard Branson may want to check his own record before attacking nationalised railway's

Let he who is without subpar punctuality records cast the first stone.

Richard Branson, on the World at One this morning, was laying into the government's handling of the West Coast Mainline franchise, while also using it as an opportunity to attack the idea of renationalisation more generally:

If they [the government] can't run a bid process, they're going to find it even harder to run a railway.

According to Network Rail, in the 366 days to 15 September 2012, 87.5 per cent of trains on the state-run East Coast franchise arrived on time.

Over the same period, 86 per cent of trains on the Richard Branson-run Virgin Trains franchise arrived on time.

So, a smaller percentage of trains arrive on time on Branson's network than on the state's. If Branson thinks the government can't run railways, what on earth is he doing still owning one?

Richard Branson. Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.