"Get lost, you rich bastard"? It was so much ruder than that.

The real translation is not so safe for work.

There is little love lost, it would seem, between the French newspaper Liberation and Bernard Arnault, France’s richest man and CEO of luxury fashion conglomerate LMVH.

Rumours are circulating that Arnault is planning to apply for Belgian citizenship after Francois Hollande proposed a new 75 per cent tax rate on earnings over one million Euros. Liberation didn’t waste many words in letting the country know what exactly it thought of Arnault’s proposed relocation: "Casse-toi riche con!" screamed its headline today.

The English speaking press has rather quaintly translated this savage announcement as "Get lost you rich bastard". However – this is not quite correct. In my early twenties, I went out with a French girl for a couple of years; by the end of our relationship my French had improved somewhat and, in particular, I had learnt a few juicy put-downs. "Con" is certainly one of them and refers to at least one bodily… area. Have a Google (not at work).

This article can be read in full at Spear's.

Bernard Arnault. Photograph: Getty Images

Mark Nayler is a senior researcher at Spear's magazine.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.