The 10 most ridiculous Apple iOS 6 map mistakes

The stretched Eiffel Tower and the vanishing Tokyo station: Apple's new maps don't work too well.

Apple's new mapping service for the iPhone, which is part of its operating system update, is provoking a huge backlash from users, as the system makes mistake after mistake.

Here are ten of the most ridiculous.

1. They shrank the Sears Tower in Chicago:

2. The Manhattan end of the Brooklyn Bridge looks like it's had a bit of an accident:

3. They messed up their image of an Apple store (terrible advertising):

 

4. Helsinki now has a railway station in the park:

5. A greenfield site in Dublin called "Airfield" has been labelled as as an airport:

(Image from Gavan Reilly/TheJournal.ie)

6. A search for "London" sometimes brings you to the one in Canada:

(via ausbt.com)

7. Paddington station's gone:

(via ausbt.com)

8. Doncaster is now only searchable as "Duncaster":

(via phonearea.com)

9. Tokyo station is no more:

(via ausbt.com)

10. And the Eiffel Tower looks kinda odd:

(via theamazingios6maps.tumblr.com)

It seems Apple is taking "think different" to another level.

The earth. Photograph: theamazingios6maps.tumblr.com

Martha Gill writes the weekly Irrational Animals column. You can follow her on Twitter here: @Martha_Gill.

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Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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