The 10 most ridiculous Apple iOS 6 map mistakes

The stretched Eiffel Tower and the vanishing Tokyo station: Apple's new maps don't work too well.

Apple's new mapping service for the iPhone, which is part of its operating system update, is provoking a huge backlash from users, as the system makes mistake after mistake.

Here are ten of the most ridiculous.

1. They shrank the Sears Tower in Chicago:

2. The Manhattan end of the Brooklyn Bridge looks like it's had a bit of an accident:

3. They messed up their image of an Apple store (terrible advertising):

 

4. Helsinki now has a railway station in the park:

5. A greenfield site in Dublin called "Airfield" has been labelled as as an airport:

(Image from Gavan Reilly/TheJournal.ie)

6. A search for "London" sometimes brings you to the one in Canada:

(via ausbt.com)

7. Paddington station's gone:

(via ausbt.com)

8. Doncaster is now only searchable as "Duncaster":

(via phonearea.com)

9. Tokyo station is no more:

(via ausbt.com)

10. And the Eiffel Tower looks kinda odd:

(via theamazingios6maps.tumblr.com)

It seems Apple is taking "think different" to another level.

The earth. Photograph: theamazingios6maps.tumblr.com

Martha Gill writes the weekly Irrational Animals column. You can follow her on Twitter here: @Martha_Gill.

Matt Cardy/Getty Images
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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.