Jackson Hole Symposium: Ben Bernake cements Fed's dedication to boosting employment

Then scuttles off for barbecue and line-dancing

 

Ben Bernake, chairman of the US Federal Reserve, just announced to fellow economists that the American central bank is renewing its duty to spur job growth through quantitative easing.

Jackson Hole, Wyoming, has hosted the annual Federal Reserve Symposium since 1982, and is famous for its world-class fly-fishing conditions (this is what supposedly made Volcker – as in the Volcker Rule – start attending) and provides a scenic backdrop for some very serious chat. However, Jackson Hole also provides a leisurely escape for some of the world's most consequential decision-makers. As Businessinsider notes:

Jackson Hole provides a nice opportunity for central bankers to let down their hair a bit — only figuratively speaking, of course — and mingle with other members of their tribe and a few academics in an informal setting," says Eswar Prasad, a Cornell University professor who will speak on a Jackson Hole panel this year.

A notable absence this year is Mario Draghi, president of the ECB, who will be missing out on this afternoon’s barbecue shenanigans where "some of the world's most high-powered economists don cowboy hats, string ties and other Western gear and sometimes join in a line dance". 

Photograph: Getty Images
Photo: Getty
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Donald Trump's inauguration signals the start of a new and more unstable era

A century in which the world's hegemonic power was a rational actor is about to give way to a more terrifying reality. 

For close to a century, the United States of America has been the world’s paramount superpower, one motivated by, for good and for bad, a rational and predictable series of motivations around its interests and a commitment to a rules-based global order, albeit one caveated by an awareness of the limits of enforcing that against other world powers.

We are now entering a period in which the world’s paramount superpower is neither led by a rational or predictable actor, has no commitment to a rules-based order, and to an extent it has any guiding principle, they are those set forward in Donald Trump’s inaugural: “we will follow two simple rules: hire American and buy American”, “from this day forth, it’s going to be America first, only America first”.

That means that the jousting between Trump and China will only intensify now that he is in office.  The possibility not only of a trade war, but of a hot war, between the two should not be ruled out.

We also have another signal – if it were needed – that he intends to turn a blind eye to the actions of autocrats around the world.

What does that mean for Brexit? It confirms that those who greeted the news that an US-UK trade deal is a “priority” for the incoming administration, including Theresa May, who described Britain as “front of the queue” for a deal with Trump’s America, should prepare themselves for disappointment.

For Europe in general, it confirms what should already been apparent: the nations of Europe are going to have be much, much more self-reliant in terms of their own security. That increases Britain’s leverage as far as the Brexit talks are concerned, in that Britain’s outsized defence spending will allow it acquire goodwill and trade favours in exchange for its role protecting the European Union’s Eastern border.

That might allow May a better deal out of Brexit than she might have got under Hillary Clinton. But there’s a reason why Trump has increased Britain’s heft as far as security and defence are concerned: it’s because his presidency ushers in an era in which we are all much, much less secure. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.