Jackson Hole Symposium: Ben Bernake cements Fed's dedication to boosting employment

Then scuttles off for barbecue and line-dancing

 

Ben Bernake, chairman of the US Federal Reserve, just announced to fellow economists that the American central bank is renewing its duty to spur job growth through quantitative easing.

Jackson Hole, Wyoming, has hosted the annual Federal Reserve Symposium since 1982, and is famous for its world-class fly-fishing conditions (this is what supposedly made Volcker – as in the Volcker Rule – start attending) and provides a scenic backdrop for some very serious chat. However, Jackson Hole also provides a leisurely escape for some of the world's most consequential decision-makers. As Businessinsider notes:

Jackson Hole provides a nice opportunity for central bankers to let down their hair a bit — only figuratively speaking, of course — and mingle with other members of their tribe and a few academics in an informal setting," says Eswar Prasad, a Cornell University professor who will speak on a Jackson Hole panel this year.

A notable absence this year is Mario Draghi, president of the ECB, who will be missing out on this afternoon’s barbecue shenanigans where "some of the world's most high-powered economists don cowboy hats, string ties and other Western gear and sometimes join in a line dance". 

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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.