"Hitler" store in India sparks outrage

But why?

As reported by the NY Times India Ink Blog, two astute businessmen in Gujarat are cashing in on one of the most universally despised personalities ever.

In an interview with Der Spiegel, Rajesh Shah, co-owner, innocently confesses that the clothing store was named after his business partner’s grandfather, a man so notoriously autocratic that he earned the hilarious epithet of "Hitler". (I would encourage you to read the entire interview - Shah is a comedic genius.)

And so, with a 150,000 rupee (£1,700) investment in a sign, brochures, and business cards, the Gujarati duo may well have launched the most cost-effective marketing campaign (at least in terms of span) of recent times. Shock waves have been reverberating through the Internet all day (and here goes another echo), highlighting the effectiveness of what advertising scholars have long dubbed the “shock LOL factor”.

Still, I’m not really sure why everyone is so outraged. Dear old Adolf is probably rolling over in his grave at the moment, grunting furiously at the fact that his name is being used to catalyse the capitalist machine he loathed. After all, non-Aryans are indulging their materialistic whims at his expense, and no matter how shocking or appalling that may be, no individual has the power to keep Rajesh from promoting it. 

 

Priceless juxtaposition. Photograph: Getty Images
Getty Images.
Show Hide image

PMQs review: Jeremy Corbyn bids for the NHS to rescue Labour

Ahead of tomorrow's by-elections, Corbyn damned Theresa May for putting the service in a "state of emergency".

Whenever Labour leaders are in trouble, they seek political refuge in the NHS. Jeremy Corbyn, whose party faces potential defeat in tomorrow’s Copeland and Stoke by-elections, upheld this iron law today. In the case of the former, Labour has already warned that “babies will die” as a result of the downgrading of the hospital. It is crude but it may yet prove effective (it worked for No to AV, after all).

In the chamber, Corbyn assailed May for cutting the number of hospital beds, worsening waiting times, under-funding social care and abolishing nursing bursaries. The Labour leader rose to a crescendo, damning the Prime Minister for putting the service in a “a state of emergency”. But his scattergun attack was too unfocused to much trouble May.

The Prime Minister came armed with attack lines, brandishing a quote from former health secretary Andy Burnham on cutting hospital beds and reminding Corbyn that Labour promised to spend less on the NHS at the last election (only Nixon can go to China). May was able to boast that the Tories were providing “more money” for the service (this is not, of course, the same as “enough”). Just as Corbyn echoed his predecessors, so the Prime Minister sounded like David Cameron circa 2013, declaring that she would not “take lessons” from the party that presided over the Mid-Staffs scandal and warning that Labour would “borrow and bankrupt” the economy.

It was a dubious charge from the party that has racked up ever-higher debt but a reliably potent one. Labour, however, will be satisfied that May was more comfortable debating the economy or attacking the Brown government, than she was defending the state of the NHS. In Copeland and Stoke, where Corbyn’s party has held power since 1935 and 1950, Labour must hope that the electorate are as respectful of tradition as its leader.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.