Alison Carnwarth: “I sometimes... don’t go to sleep at all because I’m anxious”

Why did Alison Carnwarth quit? Her last interview gives a few clues.

Alison Carnwarth has just quit her position on Barclays' board, continuing a series of resignations which has included Marcus Agius, Bob Diamond and Jerry del Missier.

Her statement read: “With regret I have concluded that I am no longer able to devote sufficient time to my role as a director of Barclays given my other commitments.”

She cited no other reasons, and her decision has left people speculating. But her most recent interview, given to economia magazine, gives a few clues. Here's an extract:

“None of us can be proud of how all this [Bob Diamond's renumeration package] was portrayed to the great British public.” She’s keen to point out that she is aware of the mood in the country, and what “people have had to put up with, ordinary people like you and me. When I’m not doing my job I’m an ordinary person. “But, remuneration and risks aside, to sit on the board of somewhere like Barclays, you have a window on how the world is working. You see where the capital flows are around the world, you see where the liquidity is, and you see where the stresses are in the financial system.”

Like any ordinary person, she worries. “I sometimes wake up worried – or don’t go to sleep at all because I’m anxious,” she says. “That’s not so good. Last night I lay awake fretting about something. I then have to stand up and somehow all the worry drains out of my feet, or I write things down."

She said that "a lot of pressures" had come to bear on the remuneration committee.

“It’s not easy, and we don’t always get it right. We clearly didn’t get it right this year. The shareholders were a little upset, although they weren’t upset in the same way as we’ve seen at other companies; our proposals did get through. But, whereas in previous years we would have got perhaps 85% voting in favour of our remuneration report, this year it was just over 70%. So clearly there were some major institutions that were not in agreement with what we did, and we must try to communicate better.”

“I’m very sensitive to the general feeling out there, when people are miserable and unemployed."

The full interview can be read in Friday's economia.

Barclays. Photograph, Getty Images.
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#Match4Lara: Lara has found her match, but the search for mixed-race donors isn't over

A UK blood cancer charity has seen an "unprecedented spike" in donors from mixed race and ethnic minority backgrounds since the campaign started. 

Lara Casalotti, the 24-year-old known round the world for her family's race to find her a stem cell donor, has found her match. As long as all goes ahead as planned, she will undergo a transplant in March.

Casalotti was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukaemia in December, and doctors predicted that she would need a stem cell transplant by April. As I wrote a few weeks ago, her Thai-Italian heritage was a stumbling block, both thanks to biology (successful donors tend to fit your racial profile), and the fact that mixed-race people only make up around 3 per cent of international stem cell registries. The number of non-mixed minorities is also relatively low. 

That's why Casalotti's family launched a high profile campaign in the US, Thailand, Italy and the US to encourage more people - especially those from mixed or minority backgrounds - to register. It worked: the family estimates that upwards of 20,000 people have signed up through the campaign in less than a month.

Anthony Nolan, the blood cancer charity, also reported an "unprecedented spike" of donors from black, Asian, ethcnic minority or mixed race backgrounds. At certain points in the campaign over half of those signing up were from these groups, the highest proportion ever seen by the charity. 

Interestingly, it's not particularly likely that the campaign found Casalotti her match. Patient confidentiality regulations protect the nationality and identity of the donor, but Emily Rosselli from Anthony Nolan tells me that most patients don't find their donors through individual campaigns: 

 It’s usually unlikely that an individual finds their own match through their own campaign purely because there are tens of thousands of tissue types out there and hundreds of people around the world joining donor registers every day (which currently stand at 26 million).

Though we can't know for sure, it's more likely that Casalotti's campaign will help scores of people from these backgrounds in future, as it has (and may continue to) increased donations from much-needed groups. To that end, the Match4Lara campaign is continuing: the family has said that drives and events over the next few weeks will go ahead. 

You can sign up to the registry in your country via the Match4Lara website here.

Barbara Speed is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman and a staff writer at CityMetric.