10 ways to save time at work

A handy guide.

We all wish we could turn the clock back, make different decisions and spend more time with the kids. With hindsight, we'd all have lived our lives differently, especially, I suspect, at work. You see it's at work where the most time gets wasted. Wasted time is lost time. Time that could have been made making better decisions. Better because with more time and less pressure, decision making becomes more objective.

So whilst I cannot tell you how to go back and change the past, I can help you make more time in the future. That way you'll gain time you'd otherwise lose. You'll make good decisions and have more time for family, friends and fun.

Here are ten simple things that will help your time travel more slowly:

  1. Define your vision and focus on this, not the carrot on the end of the corporate stick;
  2. Write down, in the present tense, how your Iife will look in five years time;
  3. Making scheduling tomorrow's tasks the last thing you do at work each day. Then start your day with the most important from that list;
  4. If you're desk based, run your PC with two screens - then you can use two applications at the same time - the improvement in efficiency will amaze you;
  5. Go paperless and use a tablet computer when on the move - invest - integrate - work simply;
  6. Avoid pointless meetings - when you do meet, keep to both agenda and time - leave when bored - nobody will sack you;
  7. Be brutal with time thieves - get 1:1 meetings done in an hour - don't 'drop by' or allow others to drop in on you;
  8. Say no to stuff that's not for you. Instead, volunteer for stuff that builds your career;
  9. Keep fit - make time to work out and make it sacred;
  10. Break routines - this blog was written on a hot afternoon by the pool.

Robert Ashton's book Teach Yourself Time Management in a Week, is published by Hodder Education

Photograph: Getty Images

Robert Ashton's book Teach Yourself Time Management in a Week, is published by Hodder Education

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It's Gary Lineker 1, the Sun 0

The football hero has found himself at the heart of a Twitter storm over the refugee children debate.

The Mole wonders what sort of topsy-turvy universe we now live in where Gary Lineker is suddenly being called a “political activist” by a Conservative MP? Our favourite big-eared football pundit has found himself in a war of words with the Sun newspaper after wading into the controversy over the age of the refugee children granted entry into Britain from Calais.

Pictures published earlier this week in the right-wing press prompted speculation over the migrants' “true age”, and a Tory MP even went as far as suggesting that these children should have their age verified by dental X-rays. All of which leaves your poor Mole with a deeply furrowed brow. But luckily the British Dental Association was on hand to condemn the idea as unethical, inaccurate and inappropriate. Phew. Thank God for dentists.

Back to old Big Ears, sorry, Saint Gary, who on Wednesday tweeted his outrage over the Murdoch-owned newspaper’s scaremongering coverage of the story. He smacked down the ex-English Defence League leader, Tommy Robinson, in a single tweet, calling him a “racist idiot”, and went on to defend his right to express his opinions freely on his feed.

The Sun hit back in traditional form, calling for Lineker to be ousted from his job as host of the BBC’s Match of the Day. The headline they chose? “Out on his ears”, of course, referring to the sporting hero’s most notable assets. In the article, the tabloid lays into Lineker, branding him a “leftie luvvie” and “jug-eared”. The article attacked him for describing those querying the age of the young migrants as “hideously racist” and suggested he had breached BBC guidelines on impartiality.

All of which has prompted calls for a boycott of the Sun and an outpouring of support for Lineker on Twitter. His fellow football hero Stan Collymore waded in, tweeting that he was on “Team Lineker”. Leading the charge against the Murdoch-owned title was the close ally of Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn and former Channel 4 News economics editor, Paul Mason, who tweeted:

Lineker, who is not accustomed to finding himself at the centre of such highly politicised arguments on social media, responded with typical good humour, saying he had received a bit of a “spanking”.

All of which leaves the Mole with renewed respect for Lineker and an uncharacteristic desire to watch this weekend’s Match of the Day to see if any trace of his new activist persona might surface.


I'm a mole, innit.