Interesting times for the retail sector

Things are destined to get pretty tough.

The expression “may you live in interesting times” is seen by the Chinese as a curse; interesting is not seen as a positive but, rather, is equated with disorder, problems and trouble. Such a sentiment will probably ring true with retailers next year: as fascinating as the market is from an analytical point of view, there is no denying that things are set to get pretty tough.

This view reflects several a numbers of current and upcoming challenges which are stacked against the retail sector.

Foremost among them will be a complete absence of overall real sales growth. While official headline figures may continue to profess to a market that is growing, albeit anaemically, all of that growth will likely be driven by inflation; by the time this is removed, retail volumes will shrink strongly. In other words, we will all be buying less which means the spoils of consumer spending will be spread more thinly.

In many ways retail sales will be a symptom of the underlying issues, they will reflect the fact that the whole economy will remain in stasis, that consumers will continue to lack the confidence to go out and spend, and that unemployment and poor wage growth will have left many household budgets more squeezed than they have been in decades.

In addition to the above, more specific factors like fuel prices - which have come down from their record high but are likely to remain elevated – will unhelpfully change the way we shop: reducing visit frequency and deterring some from driving long distances to out-of-town centres. Equally, it is difficult to foresee an uptick in the housing market which will likely continue to remain depressed, dampening demand for DIY, furnishings and floorcoverings.  As transient as these things may yet prove to be, they will remain decidedly unhelpful to a struggling retail sector in 2012.

As demand slows, the room retailers have for manoeuvre becomes narrower. For example, many would like to increase prices to make up for hikes in the cost of doing business, but most simply won’t for fear of losing custom and share in a market that will remain increasingly price sensitive.  As a result, quite a number of players will continue to report squeezed margins and profits.

While all of this makes for gloomy reading, the truth is that these austere circumstances will reshape the retail sector and the process of reconfiguration is a painful one. The current shape of the sector – the number of shops, the amount of space, the way retailers do business – is one that was created to reflect the demands and needs of the last ten years. Things have now changed and a more muted demand environment means a new shape is required. Some of the things retailers need to be thinking about, include:

  • Rebalancing and optimising their store portfolios for the multichannel world; thinking about how many stores are really needed to reach customer and what those stores are there to do (inspire, act as a point of transaction or collection, etc.) is critical.
  • Adding value to the retail offer to ensure that customers are given compelling reasons to buy; lacklustre offers will increasingly be forced to compete on price, which is a poor differentiator and will serve only to erode margins.
  • Keeping close to customers in order to engage them and win their loyalty; with many shoppers buying less frequently, it is important for retailers to keep themselves foremost of mind.
  • Marketing through emotion and excitement; it is increasingly important for retailers to connect with consumers on an emotional and not just a functional level – consumers need to be cajoled and convinced into buying things, and emotion sells.
  • Personalising the offer and the experience; this means that retailers really need to understand consumers’ needs and desires and then translate this into all aspects of their proposition, especially within the online selling environment.

So in many ways 2012 will be a year of evolution. And just like evolution, the process of change will create casualties – some retailers have already died out, others will follow – but, longer term, it creates winners too. Those that adapt will survive and could even come out of the process stronger as a result. Some retailers have already started on this journey which is why, among the gloomy trading updates, there are occasionally chinks of light.

What do these players do to stand out? Quite simply they think, they innovate and they respond. In other words, they have interesting responses to our interesting times.

Neil Saunders is Retail Director for Canadean and Managing Director of Conlumino.

Photograph: Getty Images

 Managing Director of Conlumino

Photo: Getty Images
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The buck doesn't stop with Grant Shapps - and probably shouldn't stop with Lord Feldman, either

The question of "who knew what, and when?" shouldn't stop with the Conservative peer.

If Grant Shapps’ enforced resignation as a minister was intended to draw a line under the Mark Clarke affair, it has had the reverse effect. Attention is now shifting to Lord Feldman, who was joint chair during Shapps’  tenure at the top of CCHQ.  It is not just the allegations of sexual harrassment, bullying, and extortion against Mark Clarke, but the question of who knew what, and when.

Although Shapps’ resignation letter says that “the buck” stops with him, his allies are privately furious at his de facto sacking, and they are pointing the finger at Feldman. They point out that not only was Feldman the senior partner on paper, but when the rewards for the unexpected election victory were handed out, it was Feldman who was held up as the key man, while Shapps was given what they see as a relatively lowly position in the Department for International Development.  Yet Feldman is still in post while Shapps was effectively forced out by David Cameron. Once again, says one, “the PM’s mates are protected, the rest of us shafted”.

As Simon Walters reports in this morning’s Mail on Sunday, the focus is turning onto Feldman, while Paul Goodman, the editor of the influential grassroots website ConservativeHome has piled further pressure on the peer by calling for him to go.

But even Feldman’s resignation is unlikely to be the end of the matter. Although the scope of the allegations against Clarke were unknown to many, questions about his behaviour were widespread, and fears about the conduct of elections in the party’s youth wing are also longstanding. Shortly after the 2010 election, Conservative student activists told me they’d cheered when Sadiq Khan defeated Clarke in Tooting, while a group of Conservative staffers were said to be part of the “Six per cent club” – they wanted a swing big enough for a Tory majority, but too small for Clarke to win his seat. The viciousness of Conservative Future’s internal elections is sufficiently well-known, meanwhile, to be a repeated refrain among defenders of the notoriously opaque democratic process in Labour Students, with supporters of a one member one vote system asked if they would risk elections as vicious as those in their Tory equivalent.

Just as it seems unlikely that Feldman remained ignorant of allegations against Clarke if Shapps knew, it feels untenable to argue that Clarke’s defeat could be cheered by both student Conservatives and Tory staffers and the unpleasantness of the party’s internal election sufficiently well-known by its opponents, without coming across the desk of Conservative politicians above even the chair of CCHQ’s paygrade.

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.