J P Morgan loss: by numbers

$14bn wiped off bank's value.

Jamie Dimon, chief executive of J P Morgan, provided one of the soundbites of the week when he described events that wiped billions of dollars off the value of his bank thus: 

These were grievous mistakes, they were self inflicted, we were accountable and we happened to violate our own standards and principles by how we want to operate the company

It marked a major change of heart from Dimon who had dismissed earlier suggestions that something was badly wrong at the company he runs as "a complete tempest in a teapot".

And when you look at the numbers involved, it's not difficult to see why he changed his view:

 

$2bn – the amount the investment bank reported it had lost as a result of trades originally designed to protect it against the volatility of the financial markets. The trader at the heart of the affair is reported to be Bruno Iksil, based in London and owner of two nicknames: "London Whale" and Harry Potter's nemesis Voldemort.

$1bn – Dimon conceded that the overall losses could end up being even higher, possibly another $1bn.

$14.4bn – wiped off J P Morgan's share value on Friday following the announcement.

$350bn – vaule of assets held by J P Morgan's chief investment office in which Iksil worked. 

$100m – the amount Iksil is thought to have generated for the investment bank before this latest turn of events.

$14m – while it is not clear how much Iksil gets paid this is how much the boss of the CIO division, Ina Drew, received last year.

 

 

J P Morgan Chase CEO: "grievous mistakes"

Jon Bernstein, former deputy editor of New Statesman, is a digital strategist and editor. He tweets @Jon_Bernstein. 

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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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