Met police statement contradicted by video

Does it look like a cyclist "fell off" his bike?

Something happened on the Olympic torch relay as it went through Suffolk yesterday. Here's how the Metropolitan police described it to the BBC:

A male on a pedal cycle attempted to enter the security bubble around the torchbearer. The Met's torch security team prevented him from gaining access to the torchbearer and the male fell off his bike. He immediately got back on his bike and left.

Got that? Now watch the video of the event:

The two simply do not match up. Quite why the Met thought it was acceptable to give a statement when they weren't yet sure of what had happened is unclear. As concerning is the fact that the BBC, despite possessing footage of the event, didn't think it worth while to question the statement in any way.

The attitude of the police seems to have been to issue a statement exonerating officers entirely, then start looking into what actually happened. That may have worked ten years ago, but when those statements are put up alongside instantly available video, it does nothing but erode trust in the police force.

If you know the cyclist in the video, please encourage him to get in touch at alex.hern@newstatesman.co.uk

A cyclist "falls off his bike".

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Listen: Schools Minister Nick Gibb gets SATs question for 11-year-olds wrong

Exams put too much pressure on children. And on the politicians who insist they don't put too much pressure on children.

As we know from today's news of a primary school exams boycott, or "kids' strike", it's tough being a schoolchild in Britain today. But apparently it's also tough being a Schools Minister.

Nick Gibb, Minister of State at the Department for Education, failed a SATs grammar question for 11-year-olds on the BBC's World at One today. Having spent all morning defending the primary school exams system - criticised by tens of thousands of parents for putting too much pressure on young children - he fell victim to the very test that has come under fire.

Listen here:

Martha Kearney: Let me give you this sentence, “I went to the cinema after I’d eaten my dinner”. Is the word "after" there being used as a subordinating conjunction or as a preposition?

Nick Gibb: Well, it’s a proposition. “After” - it's...

MK: [Laughing]: I don’t think it is...

NG: “After” is a preposition, it can be used in some contexts as a, as a, word that coordinates a subclause, but this isn’t about me, Martha...

MK: No, I think, in this sentence it’s being used a subordinating conjunction!

NG: Fine. This isn’t about me. This is about ensuring that future generations of children, unlike me, incidentally, who was not taught grammar at primary school...

MK: Perhaps not!

NG: ...we need to make sure that future generations are taught grammar properly.

I'm a mole, innit.