Met police statement contradicted by video

Does it look like a cyclist "fell off" his bike?

Something happened on the Olympic torch relay as it went through Suffolk yesterday. Here's how the Metropolitan police described it to the BBC:

A male on a pedal cycle attempted to enter the security bubble around the torchbearer. The Met's torch security team prevented him from gaining access to the torchbearer and the male fell off his bike. He immediately got back on his bike and left.

Got that? Now watch the video of the event:

The two simply do not match up. Quite why the Met thought it was acceptable to give a statement when they weren't yet sure of what had happened is unclear. As concerning is the fact that the BBC, despite possessing footage of the event, didn't think it worth while to question the statement in any way.

The attitude of the police seems to have been to issue a statement exonerating officers entirely, then start looking into what actually happened. That may have worked ten years ago, but when those statements are put up alongside instantly available video, it does nothing but erode trust in the police force.

If you know the cyclist in the video, please encourage him to get in touch at alex.hern@newstatesman.co.uk

A cyclist "falls off his bike".

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Jeremy Corbyn appoints Shami Chakrabarti to lead inquiry into Labour and antisemitism

“Labour is an anti-racist party to its core," says leader.

Jeremy Corbyn has announced plans for an independent inquiry into antisemitism in the Labour party.

The review – led by Shami Chakrabarti, the former director of the human rights campaign group Liberty – will consult with the Jewish community and other minority groups, and report back within two months.

Its vice chair will be the director of the Pears Institute for the Study of Anti-semitism, Professor David Feldman.

The move follows a week in which the party suspended Bradford MP Naz Shah and former London mayor Ken Livingstone, amid claims that both had made antisemitic remarks.

But Corbyn told the Guardian: “Labour is an anti-racist party to its core and has a long and proud history of standing against racism, including antisemitism. I have campaigned against racism all my life and the Jewish community has been at the heart of the Labour party and progressive politics in Britain for more than 100 years.”

He added that he would not see the results of next Thursday's local elections as a reflection of his leadership, and insisted that he would not be held to arbitrary measures of success.

“I’m keeping going, I was elected with a very large mandate and I have a huge responsibility to the people who elected me to this position," he said.

Jonn Elledge is the editor of the New Statesman's sister site CityMetric. He is on Twitter, far too much, as @JonnElledge.