Why the UK moved closer to the EU exit today

If Osborne fails to secure "safeguards" for the City of London, Britain's membership will be in doubt.

George Osborne's assertion that the UK will require "safeguards" for the City of London before consenting to the creation of a eurozone banking union is an important moment. The Chancellor is effectively renegotiating the terms of Britain's EU membership in public. Referring to David Cameron's "veto" of the fiscal compact last December, he told the Today programme:

We were identifying a potential issue for the UK, which is do we want, as Europe’s largest financial centre, to have a banking union on our doorstep without certain safeguards?

There will have to be safeguards, there will have to be conditions to protect Britain’s most important industry, its largest private-sector employer and, by the way, Europe's largest financial centre.

It was odd of Osborne to cite Cameron's "veto" as an example of how the UK could win safeguards. As Tory MPs well know, Cameron won nothing of the sort. He received no guarantee that members of the fiscal union would be blocked from using the EU's institutions to alter the terms of the single market. As the PM was later forced to admit, "I'm not making a great claim to have achieved a safeguard".

There is no reason to think that he will prove any more successful in winning special treatment for the City of London. Channel 4 News's Faisal Islam notes that a eurozone banking union "will not function properly without some oversight of the wilder activities of the City of London casino. The shadow banking system in particular is disproportionately run from the Thames."

If, as seems likely, Osborne fails to prevent greater regulation of the City that will strengthen the hand of those Tories who argue that EU membership is no longer in Britain's interests. And that would raise the prospect of an in/out referendum on EU (see David Owen's piece for more on this), something the Tories have privately refused to rule out. With such a referendum likely to end in a No vote, it is no longer inconceivable that the UK could leave the EU in the second term of a Conservative-led government.

Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne leaves Number 11 Downing Street on May 10, 2012. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Photo: Getty
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As crime moves online, the police need the investment in technology to follow

Technology offers solutions, not just threats.

It’s perhaps inevitable that as the world becomes more digital, so does crime. This week Alison Saunders, director of public prosecutions, recognised that online crime is as serious as face-to-face crime. “Hate is hate,” Saunders wrote referring to internet abuse, and the police should protect people from it wherever they are. This will add demand to under-pressure police forces. And it is only the tip of the iceberg. 

Forty-seven per cent of crime involves an online element. Police recorded 30,000 instances of online stalking and harassment last year. People are 20 times more likely to be a victim of fraud than robbery, costing businesses an estimated £144bn a year. On a conservative estimate, 2,500 UK citizens use the anonymous dark web browser, Tor, for illegal purposes such as drug dealing, revenge porn and child sexual exploitation.

The police need new technology to meet demand, a Reform report published today finds. Some progress has been made in recent years. West Midlands Police uses an online portal for people to report incidents. Durham uses evidence-gathering software to collect social media information on suspects, and then instantly compile a report that can be shared with courts. Police have benefited from smartphones to share information, and body-worn cameras, which have reduced complaints against police by 93 per cent.

Yet, Theresa May’s 2016 remarks that police use “technology that lags woefully behind what they use as consumers” still stand. Officers interviewed for Reform’s research implored: “Give us the tools to do our job”.

Online evidence portals should be upgraded to accept CCTV footage. Apps should be developed to allow officers to learn about new digital threats, following the US army’s library of knowledge-sharing apps. Augmented-reality glasses are being used in the Netherlands to help officers identify evidence at digital crime scenes. Officers would save a trip back to the station if they could collect fingerprints on smartphones and statements on body-worn cameras.

New technology requires investment, but forces are reducing the resources put into IT as reserves have dried up. Durham plans to cut spend by 60 per cent between 2015-16 and 2019-20. The government should help fund equipment which can meet demand and return future productivity savings. If the Home Office invested the same as the Department of Health, another department pushing “transformative” technology, it would invest an extra £450m a year. This funding should come from administrative savings delivered through accelerating the Government’s automation agenda, which the think tank Reform has previously calculated would save Whitehall £2.6bn a year.

As crime moves online, police must follow. Saunders is right to point to the importance of meeting it. But technology offers solutions, not just threats. Installing the next generation of equipment will give police the tools to do their jobs, addressing online hate and more. 

Alexander Hitchcock is a senior researcher at reform