Osborne emerges unscathed from Leveson

The Tories will be delighted with the Chancellor's calm performance.

Given the potential for upset, the Conservatives will be delighted with how well George Osborne's appearance at the Leveson inquiry went. The Chancellor, who was evidently well-prepared, gave an impressively calm performance that will go way some to restoring his diminished political reputation.

There were no bombshells, no revelations of inappropriate contact with the Murdochs, and Osborne successfully fielded a series of questions on Jeremy Hunt and Andy Coulson. Asked why Hunt was given responsibility for the BSkyB bid, he passed the buck to the then-permanent secretary, Jeremy Heywood, who advised that the Culture Secretary should be handed control. Hunt's publicly-expressed support for the bid was "not considered" a problem, although Osborne notably added that the inquiry would need to ask David Cameron about the legal advice he received on the subject.

On Coulson, he argued persuasively that the former News of the World editor was hired principally for his journalistic nous, not for his News International contacts ("which were already well-established"). The Chancellor, who told the inquiry that he remained "a friend" of Coulson ("though sadly I have not been able to speak to him for a year"), expressed genuine regard for Coulson's abilities as a spinner. As Rafael wrote recently, the Tories feel sorrow, rather than anger, at his downfall.

Osborne revealed that he asked Coulson whether there was "more in the phone-hacking story that was going to come out" and accepted his assurances. He added that he assumed that there was nothing more to be revealed because of statements from the Press Complaints Commission and the trial of Clive Goodman and Glenn Mulcaire. In a missed opportunity, Robert Jay QC did not go on to ask Osborne whether he changed his view when the Guardian revealed that phone-hacking went far beyond "one rogue reporter". We already know from Coulson's testimony that Cameron, perhaps afraid of what he would learn, sought no further assurances at this point.

Cameron and those who advised him (including Osborne) remain guilty of showing terrible judgement by appointing Hunt and Coulson to their respective positions. The Murdoch scandal continues to dog every attempt they make to relaunch their moribund government. It has provided, and will continue to provide, Labour with an endless stream of bad news stories. But, for now, the Tories will be relieved that Osborne's appearance merely confirmed, rather than deepened, their woes.

Chancellor George Osborne leaves after giving evidence at the Leveson inquiry. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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The section on climate change has already disappeared from the White House website

As soon as Trump was president, the page on climate change started showing an error message.

Melting sea ice, sad photographs of polar bears, scientists' warnings on the Guardian homepage. . . these days, it's hard to avoid the question of climate change. This mole's anxiety levels are rising faster than the sea (and that, unfortunately, is saying something).

But there is one place you can go for a bit of respite: the White House website.

Now that Donald Trump is president of the United States, we can all scroll through the online home of the highest office in the land without any niggling worries about that troublesome old man-made existential threat. That's because the minute that Trump finished his inauguration speech, the White House website's page about climate change went offline.

Here's what the page looked like on January 1st:

And here's what it looks like now that Donald Trump is president:

The perfect summary of Trump's attitude to global warming.

Now, the only references to climate on the website is Trump's promise to repeal "burdensome regulations on our energy industry", such as, er. . . the Climate Action Plan.

This mole tries to avoid dramatics, but really: are we all doomed?

I'm a mole, innit.