Brown goes on the attack at Leveson

The former PM's desire to settle scores made this a remarkable performance.

Gordon Brown, who has made few public statements since leaving Downing Street, has come to the Leveson inquiry with an unashamed desire to settle scores. In the first hour of his testimony, he "absolutely" denied that the Sun received permission from him or his wife to run a story on his son's cystic fibrosis, denounced James Murdoch's MacTaggart lecture as "breathtaking in its arrogance and ambition" and quipped that "You can serve up dinner, but you can't serve up BSkyB as part of the dinner."  And there was more - the former Prime Minister told the inquiry that he had passed to a recording of Sunday Times reporters discussing "illegal (newsgathering) techniques" to the police, and contradicted Rupert Murdoch's claim that he told him he had no choice but to "make war" on his company after the Sun's defection to the Tories (one wonders if the inquiry will adjudicate on this point). Brown's prodigious memory (we haven't once heard the words "I can't recall") and righteous fury have made this one of the most remarkable performances of the inquiry.

The most difficult moment for Brown came when he was challenged on why he and his wife continued to regularly socialise with News International executives even after the Sun's story on their son. Brown replied that his wife was "one of the most forgiving people I know", an answer that some will find implausible. Was it not, rather, that Brown was so determined to win over the media that he cynically forgave even their gross abuse of his family's privacy?

Asked about his relationship with Murdoch, which was far warmer than Blair or Cameron's, Brown said it was "faintly ridiculous" to suggest he was influenced by Murdoch's views. In an amusing line, he quipped that Murdoch would have us at war with France and Germany and have Scotland as the "52nd state" (independent and Atlanticist). Of his similarly warm relationship with Daily Mail editor Paul Dacre, he said Dacre was "personally very kind" but rightly noted that this did nothing to diminish the ferocity of the Mail's attacks on Labour. Even more than Blair, Brown acquired a reputation as a media obsessive. But, he insisted, he is "so obsessed by the newspapers that I rarely read them".

Along the way, Brown has also taken the time to remind us of his opposition to euro membership and to defend his Afghanistan policy. The former PM appears to have seized an opportunity to deliver a state-of-the-nation address, leaving Robert Jay QC often struggling to keep him on topic.

Former prime minister Gordon Brown at the Leveson inquiry this morning. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Photo: Getty
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Can Philip Hammond save the Conservatives from public anger at their DUP deal?

The Chancellor has the wriggle room to get close to the DUP's spending increase – but emotion matters more than facts in politics.

The magic money tree exists, and it is growing in Northern Ireland. That’s the attack line that Labour will throw at Theresa May in the wake of her £1bn deal with the DUP to keep her party in office.

It’s worth noting that while £1bn is a big deal in terms of Northern Ireland’s budget – just a touch under £10bn in 2016/17 – as far as the total expenditure of the British government goes, it’s peanuts.

The British government spent £778bn last year – we’re talking about spending an amount of money in Northern Ireland over the course of two years that the NHS loses in pen theft over the course of one in England. To match the increase in relative terms, you’d be looking at a £35bn increase in spending.

But, of course, political arguments are about gut instinct rather than actual numbers. The perception that the streets of Antrim are being paved by gold while the public realm in England, Scotland and Wales falls into disrepair is a real danger to the Conservatives.

But the good news for them is that last year Philip Hammond tweaked his targets to give himself greater headroom in case of a Brexit shock. Now the Tories have experienced a shock of a different kind – a Corbyn shock. That shock was partly due to the Labour leader’s good campaign and May’s bad campaign, but it was also powered by anger at cuts to schools and anger among NHS workers at Jeremy Hunt’s stewardship of the NHS. Conservative MPs have already made it clear to May that the party must not go to the country again while defending cuts to school spending.

Hammond can get to slightly under that £35bn and still stick to his targets. That will mean that the DUP still get to rave about their higher-than-average increase, while avoiding another election in which cuts to schools are front-and-centre. But whether that deprives Labour of their “cuts for you, but not for them” attack line is another question entirely. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.

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