Drudging up the Lewinsky affair

The internet is aglow with chatter about the government's nuclear plans, and memories of the moment

As the dust begins to settle on the party funding fiasco, other matters are chewed over in the blogosphere.

Over at Burning Our Money, Wat Tyler is firmly behind the government’s plans to go nuclear. A comprehensive, if partial, evaluation of the wind power concludes: “The bottom line is that windmills may be a highly seductive idea from a distance, but once you get up close all you find is another giant dollop of wishful thinking.”

As if in response, Rupert Read, a Green Party councillor from Norfolk and EU candidate, blogs a compendium of his anti-nuclear arguments. He also speaks out against biofuels, claiming the craze for them is destroying rainforests when other sources of fuel are less damaging. He hails Biofulewatch, and calls on Greens to: “Firmly resist the biofuels bubble.”

Cassilis looks back on the persistent party funding revelations and says: “I really, really struggle to see why this should be such a big political issue. It reeks of the sort of problem that 100% of the non-political classes could agree on in five minutes but politicians are determined to offer a multitude of ifs and buts and pretend it’s more complicated than it is.”

Hot Ginger & Dynamite takes an interesting look at the reportage of the Russian government closing British Council offices. Western journalists – he states – are feeling nostalgic for the Cold War compared to today’s faceless terrorist enemy. He writes: “Our decades of hostility with the Russians provided a wealth of artistic and romantic allusions, which with each passing year become harder to separate from the reality of years at the brink of horrifying mutual destruction.”

As BA pilots are praised for saving scores of lives, Nick Robinson blogs while being hauled up with the PM’s entourage at Heathrow watching the crashed plane on the runway.

And finally, on the tenth anniversary of Matt Drudge’s web revelations of the Clinton-Lewinsky affair, Guido Fawkes pays homage to the act he feels began to turn the tables on the mainstream media (MSM), leading to the rise of the blogosphere: “Conventional journalists in the MSM have shifted from sneering to fearing, from deriding to envying. Technology means that any talented trouble maker with a modem can achieve Karl Marx’s dream: ownership of the means of production and distribution.” How romantic.

Owen Walker is a journalist for a number of titles within Financial Times Business, primarily focussing on pensions. He recently graduated from Cardiff University’s newspaper journalism post-graduate course and is cursed by a passion for Crystal Palace FC.
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New Digital Editor: Serena Kutchinsky

The New Statesman appoints Serena Kutchinsky as Digital Editor.

Serena Kutchinsky is to join the New Statesman as digital editor in September. She will lead the expansion of the New Statesman across a variety of digital platforms.

Serena has over a decade of experience working in digital media and is currently the digital editor of Newsweek Europe. Since she joined the title, traffic to the website has increased by almost 250 per cent. Previously, Serena was the digital editor of Prospect magazine and also the assistant digital editor of the Sunday Times - part of the team which launched the Sunday Times website and tablet editions.

Jason Cowley, New Statesman editor, said: “Serena joins us at a great time for the New Statesman, and, building on the excellent work of recent years, she has just the skills and experience we need to help lead the next stage of our expansion as a print-digital hybrid.”

Serena Kutchinsky said: “I am delighted to be joining the New Statesman team and to have the opportunity to drive forward its digital strategy. The website is already established as the home of free-thinking journalism online in the UK and I look forward to leading our expansion and growing the global readership of this historic title.

In June, the New Statesman website recorded record traffic figures when more than four million unique users read more than 27 million pages. The circulation of the weekly magazine is growing steadily and now stands at 33,400, the highest it has been since the early 1980s.