Dizzy leads the way...

As one of the political bloggers breaks as story that gets picked up in the mainstream plus a row ab

A leading political blogger known as Dizzy, was driving the news agenda this week with the likes of Channel 4 and The Times lapping up his wake.

On his blog, Dizzy Thinks, he broke the story on Wednesday of the first signs of Gordon Brown’s leadership campaign. The production company Silverfish TV, responsible for the 'Dave the Chameleon' advert, has bought the gordonbrown4leader.com web address.

Silverfish TV have said they are not working for Gordon Brown or the Treasury and merely bought it for when he officially declared his candidacy.
Channel 4 ran the story and said they had discovered the story. They hadn’t. The Times also ran it but at least they didn't claim it was their exclusive.

Credit has to be given to bloggers who break stories. Guido Fawkes raised this point when he took on Michael White and Jeremy Paxman on Newsnight two weeks ago - documented by my colleague on this blog review.

Dizzy also reported this week how a landmark ruling in the courts could mean that bosses who monitor their staff’s emails could be breaking European laws. This article highlights the need for companies to have properly drawn up usage policies for their employees email accounts, otherwise they may be breaching European human rights laws.

Oliver
Kamm's article
on the Guardian's Comment is Free blog caused quite a stir this week. Kamm claims political blogs are full of errors and that they "poison healthy debate."

One reaction to the article came from Luke Akehurst who said: "But attacking political blogging as a medium because you don't like Guido is about as rational as attacking all political coverage in newspapers because you don't like Richard Littlejohn." He might just have a point.

And in response to Kamm's piece, DocSilver said: "As blogs mature, and the more irresponsible are winnowed out by the rather Darwinian process of operating in an unsheltered environment, the quality of what is offered has steadily increased."

Adam Haigh studies on the postgraduate journalism diploma at Cardiff University. Last year he lived in Honduras and worked freelance for the newspaper, Honduras This Week.
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The big problem for the NHS? Local government cuts

Even a U-Turn on planned cuts to the service itself will still leave the NHS under heavy pressure. 

38Degrees has uncovered a series of grisly plans for the NHS over the coming years. Among the highlights: severe cuts to frontline services at the Midland Metropolitan Hospital, including but limited to the closure of its Accident and Emergency department. Elsewhere, one of three hospitals in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland are to be shuttered, while there will be cuts to acute services in Suffolk and North East Essex.

These cuts come despite an additional £8bn annual cash injection into the NHS, characterised as the bare minimum needed by Simon Stevens, the head of NHS England.

The cuts are outlined in draft sustainability and transformation plans (STP) that will be approved in October before kicking off a period of wider consultation.

The problem for the NHS is twofold: although its funding remains ringfenced, healthcare inflation means that in reality, the health service requires above-inflation increases to stand still. But the second, bigger problem aren’t cuts to the NHS but to the rest of government spending, particularly local government cuts.

That has seen more pressure on hospital beds as outpatients who require further non-emergency care have nowhere to go, increasing lifestyle problems as cash-strapped councils either close or increase prices at subsidised local authority gyms, build on green space to make the best out of Britain’s booming property market, and cut other corners to manage the growing backlog of devolved cuts.

All of which means even a bigger supply of cash for the NHS than the £8bn promised at the last election – even the bonanza pledged by Vote Leave in the referendum, in fact – will still find itself disappearing down the cracks left by cuts elsewhere. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.