Opinionated? Bloggers?

Global warming, Trident ... you won't find strong opinions in the blogosphere

The Channel 4 documentary The Great Global Warming Swindle has been fuelling debate on blogs all week. George Monbiot said: "The less true a programme is, the greater the controversy." And this has certainly caused controversy.

Scientists at RealClimate say they are attempting to correct the factual inaccuracies of the programme.

Carl Wunsch, a renowned oceanographer, said he was misrepresented by C4 and has clarified his views on this blog. But plenty of people including UrbanGrounds were excited by the programme.Ellee Seymour is asking: Who swindled who?

The House of Commons vote in favour of not delaying the replacement of the Trident nuclear programme, was highlighted by Barry’s Beef.

Over at Nether-world, Davide Simonetti harked back to 1982 when Labour announced: "Labour is the only party pledged to end the nuclear madness." He also noted Peter Hain speaking in 1983 saying: "The more direct action there is against nuclear weapons in Britain, the greater the freedom a Labour government will have to get rid of them."

As the smoking ban will be enforced in two weeks in Wales and in the summer in England, it is appropriate how the Croydonian
suggested the Dutch Health Minister Ab Klink's plan to ban smoking in the Netherlands’ coffee shops is slightly bizarre. According to the Croydonian, one Dutch MP noted that this: "would be the same as banning alcohol in pubs". The ruling coalition lost the vote in the Netherlands on Wednesday.

And bloggers were again in the news this week when advertising guru Martin Sorrell said he was portrayed as a "wise-guy" when a blogger posted opinions about him. He was speaking at his High Court libel trial. We do not condone this behaviour from bloggers. How dare they express their opinion.

Adam Haigh studies on the postgraduate journalism diploma at Cardiff University. Last year he lived in Honduras and worked freelance for the newspaper, Honduras This Week.
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Labour tensions over pro-EU campaign grow

Andy Burnham warned Alan Johnson of danger of appearing part of the "establishment case". 

Compared to the Conservatives, Labour is remarkably united over the EU, with the entire shadow cabinet and 214 of its 231 MPs backing the party's In campaign. Only a handful have joined the rival Labour Leave group, though sources are confident that more, potentially including shadow ministers, will do so when David Cameron's renegotiation concludes. 

But there are notable tensions within the In campaign. At this week's shadow cabinet meeting, which received a presentation from pro-EU head Alan Johnson, Andy Burnham warned of electoral damage to Labour if it was part of the "establishment case" for staying in. Burnham emphasised the need for the party to differentiate itself from Cameron and business leaders, I'm told. Angela Eagle also spoke of her concern at the number of eurosceptic Labour supporters. 

Just as the SNP surged following the Scottish independence referendum, so some shadow cabinet members believe Ukip could do so after the EU vote. One told me of his fear that those Labour supporters who voted Out would make "the transition" to voting for Farage's party. Ukip finished second in 44 of Labour's seats at the last election and helped the Tories win marginals off the opposition. 

Among Labour's pro-Europeans, the fear is that the party's campaign will be "half-hearted". Jeremy Corbyn, a long-standing eurosceptic (who some believe would have backed withdrawal had he not become leader), struggles to express enthusiasm for remaining In. Speaking to the New Statesman, former shadow Europe minister Emma Reynolds warned: 

"The British public will expect the Labour Party to have a clear position. And we do have a clear position and that's that we're going to campaign to stay in the EU. Trying to fudge the issue or hedge your bets is not going to go down well with the British public. Of course we need to talk to people about all aspects of the EU, and that will involve talking to people about immigration, but there isn't a 'maybe' on the ballot paper it's a binary choice between remain and leave. We have to be clear with people where we are because they won't thank us for being wishy-washy."

Labour's Brexiters draw comfort from the dearth of MPs campaigning for EU membership. Kate Hoey told me: "I have been genuinely surprised how few supposedly 'pro-EU' Labour MPs have been prepared to come out and speak publicly of their support for staying in. They know, as those of us campaigning on the Leave side know, that thousands and thousands of Labour supporters, all over the country, want to come out and they are not going to receive a great reception on the doostep". 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.