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Party animals, awards and winter sun

24 Hour party people...

Those of you who have been watching the televisual gourmet dinner that is Party Animals may have spotted that a New Statesman bash was supposedly featured. Now I can't deny that we're terribly glamorous over here in Victoria - I refer you to my picture - but clearly we can't begin to compete with the raciness of the average resident of the Westminster Village.

However it's true that New Statesman does throw the odd party and one of those takes place in July when we unveil the winners of our New Media Awards. Thankfully it's not like the above mentioned television series but it does reward people/organisations that have made a contribution to our society. For details of the different categories and of how you can make a nomination click here

Cause for comment

Moving on we've been putting some of your comments into the letters pages of the New Statesman and now we're beginning to go the other way publishing letters we didn't have have room for on the website so please keep them coming. Our weekly online readership passed the 137,000 mark and part of the pleasure of the new website has been the level of debate that you've been holding.

And now I'm off to Cornwall for a bit of winter sun. I'll be leaving you in the capable hands of Simon Hooper who will be captaining the online ship for the next few days while I gorge myself on cider, dressed crab and pasties.

Ben Davies trained as a journalist after taking most of the 1990s off. Prior to joining the New Statesman he spent five years working as a politics reporter for the BBC News website. He lives in North London.
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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.