Romantic comedy can survive

America could be on the verge of falling in love with Gavin and Stacey

Gavin and Stacey in the USA

James Corden’s already perilously large ego may be about to go super-sized. If the critics are anything to go by, America may be on the verge of falling in love with Gavin and Stacey. The LA Times called the show, which has just started on BBC America, “funny, touching and welcome proof that the romantic comedy can and will survive irony, Botox, Judd Apatow and all the vagaries of the modern age”. Given the verbal castigation Corden gave The Guardian’s TV critic for wondering what all the fuss was about, it’s possibly just as well.

Immaterial Girl

The Vatican can breathe a sigh of relief, Madonna’s found a new target. Her tours have been ever-less subtle attacks on the Church, from the Blonde Ambition tour which combined sex and Catholicism (leading the Pope to demanded a boycott) to 2006’s Confessions tour which included Madge performing in a crown of thorns on a huge mirrored cross.

Now she’s got politics in her somewhat off-kilter crosshairs. Her new Sticky and Sweet tour features a montage juxtaposing Hitler, Mugabe and, em, John McCain. The McCain camp is unimpressed with a spokesman calling the comparisons "outrageous, unacceptable and crudely divisive".

Meanwhile Sheryl Crow has also been weighing into the American election debate. To encourage political engagement she’s giving away free copies of her new album to the first 50,000 people who sign up three friends to vote. Cynics who think Crow is trying to jumpstart her career should consider her recent dalliances with world issues. Last year she made her own suggestion for how America could tackle global warming.

"I propose a limitation be put on how many squares of toilet paper can be used in any one sitting. I think we are an industrious enough people that we can make it work with only one square per restroom visit, except, of course, on those pesky occasions where two to three could be required."

The Facebook Veneration

Meanwhile Aaron Sorkin’s attempts to revive his career continue apace. After the self-indulgent nonsense of Studio 60 and the tepid Charlie Wilson’s War, Sorkin is writing a screenplay about Facebook. Quite how the West Wing scribe will capture the drama of a game of Scrabulous or the exhilaration of being poked by someone you never spoke to a primary school remains to be seen. Let’s hope it fares better than his last project involving technology; the Farnsworth Invention, a play about the invention of television, which the New York Times compared to an "animated Wikipedia entry".

Don't play with Karl

Finally, Karl Lagerfeld has a new muse – himself. Kaiser Karl, so familiar in his black shades, monochrome suits and fingerless gloves that he caused a collective fashionista intake of breath when he took to wearing pink this summer, has designed a teddy bear in his own image. It’s safe to say this isn’t a toy (along with body odour, fat people, strangers, travelling and technology, Lagerfeld says he hates children), retailing for $1500.

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Katy Perry’s new song is not so much Chained to the Rhythm as Chained to a Black Mirror episode

The video for “Chained to the Rhythm” is overwhelmingly pastel and batshit crazy. Watch out, this satire is sharp!

If you’ve tuned into the radio in the last month, you might have heard Katy Perry’s new song, “Chained to the Rhythm”, a blandly hypnotic single that’s quietly, creepingly irresistible.

If you’re a really attuned listener, you might have noticed that the lyrics of this song explore that very same atmosphere. “Are we crazy?” Perry sings, “Living our lives through a lens?”

Trapped in our white picket fence
Like ornaments
So comfortable, we’re living in a bubble, bubble
So comfortable, we cannot see the trouble, trouble
Aren’t you lonely?
Up there in utopia
Where nothing will ever be enough
Happily numb

The chorus muses that we all “think we’re free” but are, in fact, “stumbling around like a wasted zombie, yeah.” It’s a swipe (hehe) at social media, Instagram culture, online dating, whatever. As we all know, modern technology is Bad, people who take photos aren’t enjoying the moment, and glimpses other people’s Perfect Lives leave us lonely and empty. Kids these days just don’t feel anything any more!!!

The video for this new song was released today, and it’s set in a (get this) METAPHORICAL AMUSEMENT PARK. Not since Banky’s Dismaland have we seen such cutting satire of modern life. Walk with me, through Katy Perry’s OBLIVIA.

Yes, the park is literally called Oblivia. Get it? It sounds fun but it’s about oblivion, the state of being unaware or unconscious, i.e. the state we’re all living in, all the time, because phones. (I also personally hope it’s a nod to Staffordshire’s own Oblivion, but cannot confirm if Katy Perry has ever been on the Alton Towers classic steel roller coaster.)

The symbol of the park is a spaced-out gerbil thing, because, aren’t we all caged little hairy beings in our own hamster wheels?! Can’t someone get us off this never-ending rat race?!

We follow Katy as she explores the park – her wide eyes take in every ride, while her peers are unable to look past the giant iPads pressed against their noses.


You, a mindless drone: *takes selfies with an iPad*
Katy Perry, a smart, engaged person: *looks around with actual human eyes, stops to smell the roses*

She walks past rides, and stops to smell the roses – and the pastel-perfect world is injected with a dose of bright red reality when she pricks her finger on a thorn. Cause that’s what life really is, kids! Risk! At least she FEELS SOMETHING.


More like the not-so-great American Dream, am I right?!

So Katy (wait, “Rose”, apparently) takes her seat on her first ride – the LOVE ME ride. Heteronormative couples take their seats against either a blue heart or a pink one, before being whizzed through a tunnel of Facebook reaction icons.

Is this a comment on social media sexism, or a hint that Rose is just too damn human for your validation station? Who knows! All we can say for sure is that Katy Perry has definitely seen the Black Mirror episode “Nosedive”:

Now, we see a whole bunch of other rides.


Wait time: um, forever, because the human condition is now one of permanent stasis and unsatisfied desires, duh.

No Place Like Home is decorated with travel stamps and catapults two of the only black people in the video out of the park. A searing comment on anti-immigrant rhetoric/racism? Uh, maybe?

Meanwhile, Bombs Away shoots you around like you’re in a nuclear missile.


War: also bad.

Then everyone goes and takes a long drink of fire water (?!?!) at Inferno H2O (?!?!) which is also a gas station. Is this about polluted water or petrol companies or… drugs? Or are we just so commercialised even fire and water are paid-for privileges? I literally don’t know.

Anyway, Now it’s time for the NUCLEAR FAMILY SHOW, in 3D, no less. Rose is last to put her glasses on because, guess what? She’s not a robot. The show includes your typical 1950s family ironing and shit, while hamsters on wheels run on the TV. Then we see people in the rest of theme park running on similar wheels. Watch out! That satire is sharp.

Skip Marley appears on the TV with his message of “break down the walls to connect, inspire”, but no one seems to notice accept Rose, and soon becomes trapped in their dance of distraction.


Rose despairs amidst the choreography of compliance.

Wow, if that didn’t make you think, are you even human? Truly?

In many ways – this is the Platonic ideal of Katy Perry videos: overwhelmingly pastel, batshit crazy, the campest of camp, yet somehow walking the fine line between self-ridicule and terrifying sincerity. It might be totally stupid, but it’s somehow still irresistible.

But then I would say that. I’m a mindless drone, stumbling around like a wasted zombie, injecting pop culture like a prescription sedative.

I’m chained…………. to the rhythm.

Anna Leszkiewicz is a pop culture writer at the New Statesman.