Why have 94 per cent of Bangladesh factory collapse victims received no compensation?

Six months on from the disaster that killed over 1,100 workers, Primark is the only brand to have offered victims compensation.

According to the UK charity Action Aid, 94 per cent of survivors and victims’ families from the April 2013 Rana Plaza factory collapse in Bangladesh, which killed over 1,100 people, have received no sick pay or compensation from their employers.

The factory collapse was the country’s worst-ever garment factory disaster, but despite public outrage at poor safety standards in the clothing industry, earlier this month ten factory workers were killed when a fire broke out at a dyeing mill in Dhaka, Bangladesh’s capital.

To date, only Primark has provided compensation to Rana Plaza victims, amounting to around ₤115 per person, for 3000 people. The Bangladesh government has also given ₤18,000 to around a third of victims and their families, but no long-term compensation agreement has been reached.

In September, the global trade union IndustriALL convened a meeting for some of the world’s largest retailers in Geneva to discuss a long-term compensation fund for victims and their families. Only nine of the 23 brands who were using the Rana Plaza factory attended, and no deal was reached. Noteworthy absentees included Benetton and Wal-Mart.

Meanwhile, 92 per cent of survivors of the Rana Plaza disaster have not returned to work, and the same proportion report being deeply traumatised. 63 per cent of survivors have been unable to work due to severe physical injuries. As a consequence, many families face mounting debts as they struggle to cover their living costs.

There have been promising indications of renewed political will to improve health and safety standards. The government of Bangladesh and ILO have launched a $25.2m plan to improve safety over the next three-and-a-half years, with financial support from the UK and Dutch governments, and 100 brands, including Primark, Next, M&S and Arcadia have signed up to a new accord to improve fire and factory safety. But, for the Rana Plaza victims still awaiting compensation this is simply far too little and far too late.

Activists and survivors of the Rana Plaza garment factory disaster demonstrate on the site where the building collapsed. Photo:Getty.

Sophie McBain is a freelance writer based in Cairo. She was previously an assistant editor at the New Statesman. She is on Twitter as @SEMcBain.

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David Cameron: "Taking more and more refugees" is not the answer to the migration crisis

As the migrant crisis worsens, the Prime Minister refuses to allow desperate people into Britain, citing "peace" in the Middle East as his priority.

David Cameron says "taking more and more refugees" is not the answer to the global migration crisis.

Amid calls for the UK to allow more people in, to help ease the record numbers of migrants entering Europe and to provide asylum for desperate people attempting to cross the border, the Prime Minister insists upon keeping the UK's doors closed.

Preferring to focus on the situation in the Middle East, Cameron commented:

We are taking action across the board... the most important thing is to try to bring peace and stability to that part of the world . . . I don't think there is an answer that can be achieved simply by taking more and more refugees.

His words come on the day that harrowing photos of a young Syrian boy, washed up dead on a beach near the Turkish resort of Bodrum, have been published. The child was from a group of 12 Syrian refugees who drowned attempting to reach Greece.

The Labour leadership candidates are taking a different stance. In a much-praised speech this week, Yvette Cooper urged the UK to take in 10,000 more refugees, warning that a failure to do so would be, “cowardly, immoral and not the British way”.

Andy Burnham too has called for Britain to take more people in (or, in his words, "share the burden"): "This is a humanitarian crisis, not just a tedious inconvenience for British holidaymakers, as our government might have us believe."

Now read this week's leader on the migration crisis, "The wretched of the earth", calling for the UK to accept more asylum seekers

Anoosh Chakelian is deputy web editor at the New Statesman.