Pakistanis caught between poverty and politics

Musharraf's declaration of emergency rule has left Pakistanis uneasy - but many are more worried whe

For ordinary Pakistanis it's been business as usual this week, despite the declaration of a state of emergency - virtual martial law - by the military government of President General Pervez Musharraf.

While pockets of civil unrest across the country and looming uncertainty about the future have contributed to an overall sense of unease, that is something the people of Pakistan have grown used to.

There is a strong police presence on the streets of Karachi with teams in armoured cars stationed at traditional rallying points like the Karachi Press Club to suppress any protests.

But most people remain unaffected by Musharraf's latest moves to consolidate power and underwhelmed by the political maneuverings of rival players such as the former prime minister Benazir Bhutto and the cricketer turned politician Imran Khan.

Most people had grown apathetic to the country's political problems, some residents said. One Karachi-based journalist said Pakistan was cursed with bad fortune.

The country has experienced so many failed political leaders in the past many doubt whether any shift in power will lead to positive change.

M. Naim-ur-Rahman, a Karachi based lawyer, echoed this perspective, saying it was unrealistic to expect people to participate in the political process when so many of them don't know where their next meal would come from. He added that democracy wasn't necessarily a perfect fit for Pakistan right now.

"Democracy only works in developed countries because that's the only place where the [average] citizen can demand accountability [from leaders]," Rahman said, adding that he supported Musharraf in spirit, praising infrastructural developments in Karachi, a city largely ignored by previous leaders.

But Rahman also criticized the leader's actions, saying that even though he was a patriot whose "heart is in the right place, he is not advised properly to fully understand his decisions."

Musharraf announced a three-pronged solution to stabilize what he saw as a country on the brink of chaos, suppressing the judiciary, media and violent extremists.

So far, the full force of emergency powers given to military and police personnel have only come down on lawyers and journalists.

Some Karachi residents are predicting a possible incursion by military forces into Balochistan and the tribal regions of the North West Frontier Province. Others say Pakistani soldiers are tired of attacking fellow Muslims and no longer have the will to fight. Many of those arrested have been released, according to reports.

"The one thing that is certain is that Pakistan is living on a prayer," said one Karachi cab driver. He added that all the forces that were pulling the country in different directions would have torn it apart by now, but for the grace of god.

But there is a growing fear among Pakistanis that the country is headed for a split and could very well be divided along provincial lines. And while many believe "Musharraf is sincere for Pakistan" and the right man to hold the country together, they are also unwilling to excuse his suppression of fundamental human rights.

In Karachi, public sentiment is shifting away from Musharraf as people begin to feel stifled by the government clamp down.

"This clamp down… you're hitting a small mouse with a tank," said Akbar Zaidi, a Karachi-based independent economist.

Zaidi said that the government had gone too far in its measures to suppress what in reality had amounted to mild dissent - and that protests had not been as substantial as opposition parties had been hoping for.

"This is a totally out of proportion response," he added. "[The government] messed it up."

When the emergency was declared, the Pakistan Electronic Media Regulatory Authority made the isolating move of blocking private news television channels indefinitely. Karachi residents turned to satellite television for the news and reports say there was a dramatic spike in the sales of satellite dishes and decoders over a three-day period.

This led to a police crackdown on dealers at the city's largest electronics market on Thursday. Some international channels have been unblocked since.

People are also concerned about the economic impact of continued instability with the price of sundry goods rising almost exponentially and after a rumor that Musharraf had been overthrown and placed under house arrest brought the stock market to it's knees. With poverty still a major problem in Pakistan and most pronounced in urban areas like Karachi, for many Pakistanis, the political turmoil in the country is background noise to rumbling stomachs.

"Those who are with money are always fine," said one city resident.
"Those who are without money are as good as dead."

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The secret anti-capitalist history of McDonald’s

As a new film focuses on the real founder of McDonald’s, his grandson reveals the unlikely story behind his family’s long-lost restaurant.

One afternoon in about the year 1988, an 11-year-old boy was eating at McDonald’s with his family in the city of Manchester, New Hampshire. During the meal, he noticed a plaque on the wall bearing a man’s face and declaring him the founder of McDonald’s. These plaques were prevalent in McDonald’s restaurants across the US at the time. The face – gleaming with pride – belonged to Ray Kroc, a businessman and former travelling salesman long hailed as the creator of the fast food franchise.

Flickr/Phillip Pessar

But this wasn’t the man the young boy munching on fries expected to see. That man was in the restaurant alongside him. “I looked at my grandfather and said, ‘But I thought you were the founder?’” he recalls. “And that’s when, in the late Eighties, early Nineties, my grandfather went back on the [McDonald’s] Corporation to set the history straight.”

Jason McDonald French, now a 40-year-old registered nurse with four children, is the grandson of Dick McDonald – the real founder of McDonald’s. When he turned to his grandfather as a confused child all those years ago, he spurred him on to correct decades of misinformation about the mysterious McDonald’s history. A story now being brought to mainstream attention by a new film, The Founder.


Jason McDonald French

“They [McDonald’s Corporation] seemed to forget where the name actually did come from,” says McDonald French, speaking on the phone from his home just outside Springfield, Massachusetts.

His grandfather Dick was one half of the McDonald brothers, an entrepreneurial duo of restaurateurs who started out with a standard drive-in hotdog stand in California, 1937.

Dick's father, an Irish immigrant, worked in a shoe factory in New Hampshire. He and his brother made their success from scratch. They founded a unique burger restaurant in San Bernardino, around 50 miles east of where they had been flogging hotdogs. It would become the first McDonald’s restaurant.

Most takeout restaurants back then were drive-ins, where you would park, order food from your car, and wait for a “carhop” server to bring you your meal on a plate, with cutlery. The McDonald brothers noticed that this was a slow, disorganised process with pointless costly overheads.

So they invented fast food.

***

In 1948, they built what came to be known as the “speedy system” for a fast food kitchen from scratch. Dick was the inventor out of the two brothers - as well as the bespoke kitchen design, he came up with both the iconic giant yellow “M” and its nickname, the “Golden Arches”.

“My grandfather was an innovator, a man ahead of his time,” McDonald French tells me. “For someone who was [only] high school-educated to come up with the ideas and have the foresight to see where the food service business was going, is pretty remarkable.”


The McDonald brothers with a milkshake machine.

McDonald French is still amazed at his grandfather’s contraptions. “He was inventing machines to do this automated system, just off-the-cuff,” he recalls. “They were using heat lamps to keep food warm beforehand, before anyone had ever thought of such a thing. They customised their grills to whip the grease away to cook the burgers more efficiently. It was six-feet-long, which was just unheard of.”

Dick even custom-made ketchup and mustard dispensers – like metal fireplace bellows – to speed up the process of garnishing each burger. The brothers’ system, which also cut out waiting staff and the cost of buying and washing crockery and cutlery, brought customers hamburgers from grill to counter in 30 seconds.


The McDonald brothers as depicted in The Founder. Photo: The Founder

McDonald French recounts a story of the McDonald brothers working late into the night, drafting and redrafting a blueprint for the perfect speedy kitchen in chalk on their tennis court for hours. By 3am, when they finally had it all mapped out, they went to bed – deciding to put it all to paper the next day. The dry, desert climate of San Bernardino meant it hadn’t rained in months.

 “And, of course, it rained that night in San Bernardino – washed it all away. And they had to redo it all over again,” chuckles McDonald French.

In another hiccup when starting out, a swarm of flies attracted by the light descended on an evening event they put on to drum up interest in their restaurant, driving customers away.


An original McDonald's restaurant, as depicted in The Founder. Photo: The Founder

***

These turned out to be the least of their setbacks. As depicted in painful detail in John Lee Hancock’s film, Ray Kroc – then a milkshake machine salesman – took interest in their restaurant after they purchased six of his “multi-mixers”. It was then that the three men drew up a fateful contract. This signed Kroc as the franchising agent for McDonald’s, who was tasked with rolling out other McDonald’s restaurants (the McDonalds already had a handful of restaurants in their franchise). 

Kroc soon became frustrated at having little influence. He was bound by the McDonalds’ inflexibility and stubborn standards (they wouldn’t allow him to cut costs by purchasing powdered milkshake, for example). The film also suggests he was fed up with the lack of money he was making from the deal. In the end, he wriggled his way around the contract by setting up the property company “McDonald’s Corporation” and buying up the land on which the franchises were built.


Ray Kroc, as depicted in The Founder. Photo: The Founder

Kroc ended up buying McDonald’s in 1961, for $2.7m. He gave the brothers $1m each and agreeing to an annual royalty of half a per cent, which the McDonald family says they never received.

“My father told us about the handshake deal [for a stake in the company] and how Kroc had gone back on his word. That was very upsetting to my grandfather, and he never publicly spoke about it,” McDonald French says. “It’s probably billions of dollars. But if my grandfather was never upset about it enough to go after the Corporation, why would we?”

They lost the rights to their own name, and had to rebrand their original restaurant “The Big M”. It was soon put out of business by a McDonald’s that sprang up close by.


An original McDonald restaurant in Arizona. Photo: Flickr/George

Soon after that meal when the 11-year-old Jason saw Kroc smiling down from the plaque for the first time, he learned the true story of what had happened to his grandfather. “It’s upsetting to hear that your family member was kind of duped,” he says. “But my grandfather always had a great respect for the McDonald’s Corporation as a whole. He never badmouthed the Corporation publicly, because he just wasn’t that type of man.”

Today, McDonalds' corporate website acknowledges the McDonalds brothers as the founders of the original restaurant, and credits Kroc with expanding the franchise. The McDonald’s Corporation was not involved with the making of The Founder, which outlines this story. I have contacted it for a response to this story, but it does not wish to comment.

***

Dick McDonald’s principles jar with the modern connotations of McDonald’s – now a garish symbol of global capitalism. The film shows Dick’s attention to the quality of the food, and commitment to ethics. In one scene, he refuses a lucrative deal to advertise Coca Cola in stores. “It’s a concept that goes beyond our core beliefs,” he rants. “It’s distasteful . . . crass commercialism.”

Kroc, enraged, curses going into business with “a beatnik”.


Photo: The Founder

Dick’s grandson agrees that McDonald’s has strayed from his family’s values. He talks of his grandfather’s generosity and desire to share his wealth – the McDonald brothers gave their restaurant to its employees, and when Dick returned to New Hampshire after the sale, he used some of the money to buy new Cadillacs with air conditioning for his old friends back home.

“[McDonald’s] is definitely a symbol of capitalism, and it definitely sometimes has a negative connotation in society,” McDonald French says. “If it was still under what my grandfather had started, I imagine it would be more like In'N'Out Burger [a fast food chain in the US known for its ethical standards] is now, where they pay their employees very well, where they stick to the simple menu and the quality.”

He adds: “I don’t think it would’ve ever blossomed into this, doing salads and everything else. It would’ve stayed simple, had quality products that were great all the time.

“I believe that he [my grandfather] wasn’t too unhappy that he wasn’t involved with it anymore.”


The McDonald’s Museum, Ray Kroc’s first franchised restaurant in the chain. Photo: Wikimedia Commons

Despite his history, Dick still took his children and grandchildren to eat at McDonald’s together – “all the time” – as does Jason McDonald French with his own children now. He’s a cheeseburger enthusiast, while his seven-year-old youngest child loves the chicken nuggets. But there was always a supersize elephant in the room.

“My grandfather never really spoke of Ray Kroc,” he says. “That was always kind of a touchy subject. It wasn’t until years later that my father told us about how Kroc was not a very nice man. And it was the only one time I ever remember my grandfather talking about Kroc, when he said: ‘Boy, that guy really got me.’”

The Founder is in UK cinemas from today.

Anoosh Chakelian is senior writer at the New Statesman.