In this week's magazine The world after Brexit

24 February 2017
  • Columns

  • Features

    • The world after Brexit

       The crucial variable is not British power but the weakness of Europe.

    • Rough justice: who is looking out for the wrongfully convicted?

      How internet sleuths - and secret courts - have changed the reporting of miscarriages of justice.

    • The perfect storm: sailors at a demonstration in Petrograd, 1917. Gaping inequalities of life in the city produced a combustible atmosphere.

      What caused the Russian revolution? Look to the powder keg of Petrograd

      How unrest exploded in 1917 – with help from Russia’s Terrible Twins.

  • Critics

    • Terry Eagleton's Materialism treats its arguments like carelessly piled bricks

      Making a case by rendering the contrary one manifestly absurd is Eagleton’s compulsive mode of argument.

    • Puget Sound

      Trailing my escort, we looked for the lost writer of Puget Sound

      I sensed a woman who wasn’t wild about her assignment. Perhaps she’d once been traumatised by a comma.

    • Yiyun Li: Can reading help you conquer depression?

      In her memoir of depression and reading, Yiyun Li speaks to all those with unquiet minds.

    • Can you first remember when you heard about time travel?

      James Gleick's Time Travel: A History offers hope and nostalgia.

    • The art of suffering: Sara Baume's A Line Made By Walking

      Dead relatives, death-filled homes, rural wanderings fill Sara Baume's haunting new novel.

    • A 1939 portrait of Pound by the English painter Wyndham Lewis

      Why Ezra Pound was the most difficult man of the twentieth century

      Adam Kirsch on Daniel Swift's The Bughouse: the Poetry, Politics and Madness of Ezra Pound.

    • Resonant: Sampson’s verse is alive to musicality

      A muse is for sharing: Fiona Sampson's Lyric Cousins

      In her latest work, Fiona Sampson’s verse is alive to musicality.

    • The perfect storm: sailors at a demonstration in Petrograd, 1917. Gaping inequalities of life in the city produced a combustible atmosphere.

      What caused the Russian revolution? Look to the powder keg of Petrograd

      How unrest exploded in 1917 – with help from Russia’s Terrible Twins.

    • Phones at a concert.

      As I get older, my taste in music is leaning towards jangly new psychedelic guitar bands

      Nicholas Lezard's Down and Out.

    • Beyond darkness: startlingly modern forms merge with function in a 19th-century Kwakwaka’wakw mask at the British Museum

      How Native American culture fought back against the colonisers

      The British Museum's new exhibition reveals the resilience of First Nations culture.

    • An image from SSGB.

      Would the BBC's Nazi drama SS-GB have felt half so resonant a year ago?

      This alternate history is freighted with meaning now we're facing the wurst-case scenario. 

    • Sienna Miller and Charlie Hunnam

      Rumbles in the jungle: highlights from the Berlin Film Festival

      Upcoming releases include drama about a trans woman and an adventure in south America.

    • John Hurt

      John Hurt's performance was too tender for Jeffrey Bernard

      BBC Radio 4's Jeffrey Bernard Is Unwell is a fitting tribute to the playfully warm, infrequently trite John Hurt.

  • Backpages

    • How Paul Giamatti changed the fate of Pinot Noir

      The actor's prickly character in Sideways - a film about wine buffs - made us appreciate this tricky grape.

    • The crowd at the match.

      I could have sworn that the Lincoln City striker was my dustman...

      Watching a game on tenterhooks to see if the manager picks his nose.