A 1912 illustration of War and Peace. Photo: DeAgostini/Getty Images
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Antonia Quirke on the best New Year's radio

Antonia Quirke rounds up the best of the New Year's radio, including War and Peace and The Supernatural North.

That BBC Radio 4 is giving over its New Year’s Day schedule almost entirely to a ten-hour adaptation of War and Peace is a good idea . . . though perhaps not nearly as good as ten hours of Tolstoy a day over ten days. (Now that would be a publicity stunt worth getting excited about.)

All programmes bar The Archers and news bulletins will find themselves moved to long-wave between 9am and 9.30pm on 1 January to make way for the adaptation, the opening episodes of which give the impression of a fat man stretching out on a duchesse brisée: comfortably sprawling. Any cuts to the 1,200-page book of 1869 feel un-brutal – War and Peace is cuttable. Not as tight as Anna Karenina, it contains expendable divagations on the Freemasons, for a start: a bewildering touch of the Balzacs, in which you suddenly find yourself next to a man in prison rambling about social justice.

Starring Simon Russell Beale as Napoleon (sublimely contrary casting: does he not personify the earnest good guy? Was he not born to play Pierre Bezukhov instead?), the adaptation is perfection in the party scenes, recorded on location in echoing halls and ballrooms – ah, the cockamamie crushes and hushed corner-conferences. The crestfallen dashes across rooms, the drunkenness.

Two other seasonal highlights to look out for, or catch up on. The Supernatural North (Radio 3, 14 December, 6.45pm), a documentary about all things far-northern – mountain trolls, demons and dire wolves, white walkers and Sámi shamans. Listen for the unprissy interview with Philip Pullman in which he describes C S Lewis’s Narnia cycle as “life-hating” and A S Byatt trippily recalling reading Asgard and the Gods as a child under a dim light (“When I got to the end of the book and all the gods were destroyed and there was nothing left, I thought, this is what the world is like”).

Correspondents Look Ahead (BBC World Service, 2 January, 1pm) is ever the most sobering but undeniably useful of start-the-year shows. A live discussion with four international news correspondents giving detailed and often opposing predictions on what is likely to shape our world in 2015, the topics slated include Russia and Ukraine, Iraq and Syria, and Iran’s current nuclear negotiations. War, then. Or rather, grievously little peace. 

Antonia Quirke is an author and journalist. She is a presenter on The Film Programme and Pick of the Week (Radio 4) and Film 2015 and The One Show (BBC 1). She writes a column on radio for the New Statesman.

This article first appeared in the 19 December 2014 issue of the New Statesman, Christmas Issue 2014

Hydar Dewachi/Owen G. Parry
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Larry is Real: how One Direction fanfiction is inspiring the London art scene

“These fictions are an opportunity to create – for pure expression in their field.

Where does the boundary lie between fanfiction and art? It’s a question that has become more and more prominent as fanfiction’s influence over popular culture continues to rise. London-based artist and Central St Martin’s lecturer Owen G Parry argues that there is no boundary at all. His latest work explores the world of “Larry Stylinson”, that is, fanfiction and fanart that explore a sexual relationship between One Direction band members Harry Styles and Louis Tomlinson.  

Showing as part of the Jerwood Gallery’s “Common Property” exhibition, Parry’s pieces include Larry Underwater Kiss, a digital silk print, Larry!Hiroglyfics, etched drawings of the couple on Perspex alongside the slogan ship everything, and Larry!Domestic: masks of Louis and Harry in pink containers, alongside a wearable pregnant belly marked with Harry’s tattoos. The exhibiton event included a live piece of performance art, featuring One Direction lookalikes kissing, hugging and undressing one another.

For Perry, these works are just one extension of an existing artistic sphere, exploring “the figure of the fan as an unassuming model for invention, mobilization and revolt”. He told the Telegraph that Larry shippers are “just presenting the normal ideals of a relationship, but actually it’s really subversive”.

“These fictions are an opportunity to create – for pure expression in their field. Fandom is a space where anything can happen. We might go back to a genuine passion in art.”

It’s an important sentiment: fanfiction writers and fanart creators, especially those working within fandoms like One Direction’s, are often young women who are intellectually and creatively dismissed. But fanfiction often provides a space for young artists who might be marginalised in the mainstream to create artwork that reflects their experiences, whether it be by racebending or reimagining characters in different power structures and dynamics.

Shipping is a key part of that, particularly for LGBTQ fans, something perhaps flattened in Perry’s statement, “Creating relationships: this is a method in fandom called ‘shipping’, which I’ve basically taken on and applied to my art practice [...] This whole installation is me ‘shipping’ materials and ideas, theories and passions.”

Of course, as long as fans have existed, fandoms of all shapes and sizes have engaged in shipping. But Larry is a particularly controversial one, because it involves playing with, and sometimes intruding upon, the lives of two real people. Larry shippers are infamous for their dedication to the ship and their insistence that it is a genuine conspiracy, rather than a fiction.

Theories usually rest on the idea that the band’s management Modest is forcing the band members to hide their sexuality and publically date women as beards, with some going as far as to suggest that the mother of Louis Tomlinson’s child, Briana Jungwirth, had a fake pregnancy. The first replies to any One Direction member’s social media posts is usually a variation of “larry” or #LarryIsReal.

Louis Tomlinson has been particularly outspoken about the ship, labelling it “bullshit” in a 2012 tweet, and reportedly saying, “it’s actually affecting the way me and Harry are in public”.

Bandmate Liam Payne called Larry shippers “absolutely nuts”, saying the theories drive him “insane”: “when you know the ins and outs of what is going on with people it's just annoying when it's so stupid. It becomes like a conspiracy or like a cult”. Zayn Malik added in an interview last year, “It’s not funny, and it still continues to be quite hard for them. They won’t naturally go put their arm around each other because they’re conscious of this thing that’s going on, which is not even true.” Some fans argue that the band members are visibly less close as a result.

Perhaps these internal criticisms and controversies miss the point. Perry sees Larry shipping as “a safe place to test out your sexuality, a fantasy space” for many young fans. As a community brimming with “passion and love” and rebellious creativity, perhaps fan-made art can have a positive impact on the art world as a whole.

All photographs by Hydar Dewachi. All artwork by Owen G Parry. Follow his fan-influenced work at fanriot.tumblr.com.

Anna Leszkiewicz is a pop culture writer at the New Statesman.