The Returning Officer: Tavistock

In 1903 the British army advanced against the Emir of Kano and the Sultan of Sokoto (in what is now Nigeria), as they had refused to submit to British authority. One of the officers, Wallace Duffield Wright, was awarded the Victoria Cross for his part in routing the much larger forces of the Muslim rulers. He received further honours in the First World War.

Wright was elected as the Tory MP for Tavistock in a 1928 by-election but stood down in 1931. John Ward Spear was the Liberal Unionist MP for the seat (1900-1906 and 1910- 18), defeating the Liberal Hugh Luttrell in 1900 and losing the seat back to him in 1906. Spear had his portrait painted by the Pre-Raphaelite artist Edward Arthur Fellowes Prynne (who also painted many other West Country politicians). It still hangs in Tavistock Town Hall.

Tavistock Town Hall. Image: Getty

This article first appeared in the 23 September 2013 issue of the New Statesman, Can Miliband speak for England?

Photo: Getty
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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.