Sport as a Metaphor for Business: Brought to you by Wimbledon Insights

IBM’s partnership with the All England Lawn Tennis Club at Wimbledon shows it can deliver complex real-time data solutions to a global audience.  The Championships showcase the company’s ability to process and analyse huge amounts of data in real time, and also what IBM can achieve with its cloud services, data analytics and social media sentiment tracking. IBM’s ability to cope efficiently with peak loads during the tournament, yet scale back at other times, is the kind of dynamic provisioning that can benefit other organisations.  

In this video IBM Client Technical Advisors Bill Jinks and Siobhan Nicholson explain how the experiences of working on the Wimbledon project help inform their business activities during the rest of the year.  Businesses and government can also gain new insights into historical data, and IBM SlamTracker’s predictive analytics illustrate how much can be derived from data that may have been gathered over many years.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.