Sport as a Metaphor for Business: Brought to you by Wimbledon Insights

IBM’s partnership with the All England Lawn Tennis Club at Wimbledon shows it can deliver complex real-time data solutions to a global audience.  The Championships showcase the company’s ability to process and analyse huge amounts of data in real time, and also what IBM can achieve with its cloud services, data analytics and social media sentiment tracking. IBM’s ability to cope efficiently with peak loads during the tournament, yet scale back at other times, is the kind of dynamic provisioning that can benefit other organisations.  

In this video IBM Client Technical Advisors Bill Jinks and Siobhan Nicholson explain how the experiences of working on the Wimbledon project help inform their business activities during the rest of the year.  Businesses and government can also gain new insights into historical data, and IBM SlamTracker’s predictive analytics illustrate how much can be derived from data that may have been gathered over many years.

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.