SlamTracker Explained: Brought to you by Wimbledon Insights

IBM’s SlamTracker provides a wealth of live scores and statistics during Wimbledon.

IBM’s SlamTracker provides a wealth of live scores and statistics during Wimbledon. In this video, IBM IT Specialist David Provan and Client Technical Advisor Siobhan Nicholson outline how SlamTracker has given fans a much deeper view of the game of tennis. Using graphics to present detailed statistics in an attractive and easy to read way, SlamTracker can give fans, players and broadcasters new perspectives through which to enjoy and assess the game. Through analysing years of past performance data (over 41 million data points), SlamTracker can also indicate the three most important things a player needs to do to beat their opponent. SlamTracker can present between 15 and 25 parameters for each point in real time, ranging from how the ball was served to to the current positive social sentiment for each player. For the wider business community, the ability to take live operational data and compare it with social media sentiment can give new insights enabling better business decisions.

New Statesman
Show Hide image

Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.